Department of Physics and Engineering Physics

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Libby Crain teaches physics to students with a hearing disability.

Giving the gift of science

Undergraduate physics student Libby Crain and physics applied assistant professor Jerry McCoy became "Wizards of Science" to help overcome the barriers of teaching deaf children about physics.

Science teachers in deaf education face tough challenges because they cannot conduct an experiment and sign to their students at the same time and the properties of sound waves are difficult to explain to someone who can’t perceive them.

Crain and McCoy organized and presented a workshop for a 2009 summer camp offered by the Total Source for Hearing-Loss and Access (TSHA). The camp, called “Wizards of Science” was designed for children who are either deaf or have a deaf sibling.

“We did an experiment in which we filled a pop bottle with liquid nitrogen and capped it,” said McCoy. “As the liquid boiled into vapor, it popped. They could feel the concussion and they loved it.”

By tapping into the children’s other senses, Crain and McCoy were able to teach them a variety of physics lessons that helped them better understand the world in which they live.

Department of Physics and Engineering Physics

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The Department of Physics and Engineering Physics offers baccalaureate degree programs that lead to a Bachelor of Arts in Physics, a Bachelor of Science in Physics, or a Bachelor of Science in Engineering Physics. The Engineering Physics program of study is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.


We also offer graduate degree programs that lead to a Master of Science in Physics, a Master of Science in Engineering Physics, or a Doctor of Philosophy in Physics. Furthermore, we offer a combined Bachelor's/Master's program that allows the highly-motivated student to earn both the Bachelor's and Master's degrees in five years.

All of our degree programs are supported by faculty-led research in the areas of theoretical plasma physics and astrophysics, materials simulation and condensed matter theory, experimental condensed matter physics, optics, photonics, laser spectroscopy, nanotechnology, and magnetic resonance.

Our students have a history of winning National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowships.  These awards provide our graduates with the funding to pursue a range of research topics in graduate school.

Student

Year Graduated

Program

 Graduate School

Adam Leeper

2007  NSF GRFP

Engineering Physics

Stanford

Thomas Loyd

2007  NSF GRFP

Engineering Physics

UNM-Al

Clara Seaman

2009  NSF GRFP

Engineering Physics

Notre Dame

Daryl Spencer

2010  NSF GRFP

Engineering Physics

UC Santa Barbara

Erin Stranford

2010  NSF GRFP

Physics

Cornell

Anne Grambrel

2011  NSF GRFP

Engineering Physics

Princeton

Tara Drwenski

2012  NSF GRFP

Physics

Universiteit Utrecht

Kirby Smithe

2013  NSF GRFP

Engineering Physics

Stanford


With that introduction, welcome to TU Physics and Engineering Physics. Please explore our web site, and if you have any questions please contact Dr. George P. Miller (undergraduate programs) or Dr. Scott A. Holmstrom (graduate programs).