Daniel Howard

Daniel Howard

Daniel Howard

PhD 2007, Biological Sciences

As an NSF Research Fellow and an advocate for increasing the number of Native Americans in the sciences, Daniel's combination of intelligence, compassion, and community activism made him an integral part of the TU community.

Howard chose TU primarily because of the work of Professor Peggy Hill, who conducts research on innovative animal behavior with a species in which he has a keen interest (the prairie mole cricket). Dr. Hill's important publications and stellar reputation in the field of behavioral ecology, as well as their shared background in secondary science education and a shared interest in increasing the number of Native Americans in the STEM fields, ensured that their collaboration would be a productive one. Howard noted that TU has a great academic reputation, and he felt very comfortable pursuing his research under Hill's guidance.

Natural Balance
Howard's research interests in integrative and comparative biology, especially insect behavioral ecology, were matched by a desire to serve his community and enhance the educational opportunities for underserved populations. In addition to being an NSF Research Fellow, Howard also served as an American Institute of Biological Sciences Diversity Scholar. His research presentations at conferences such as the 2007 Annual Meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology helped to solidify his reputation as a leading scholar in his field. Howard's role as a guiding force in the Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in the Sciences (SACNAS) and as a founding member of the TU chapter of the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) highlighted his active interest in expanding educational opportunities.

After TU
Following completion of his doctoral degree at TU, Howard started a three-year NSF Minority Postdoctoral Fellowship. The fellowship will allow him to conduct research focused on vibrational communication in insects while working at the University of Toronto, Scarborough and Victoria University, in Wellington, New Zealand.