Helmerich Center Opening Weekend - Sunday Events

Sunday, September 07, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 05:00 PM

All opening weekend events will be free and open to the public.

SUNDAY • SEPTEMBER 7

Maya Ruins Dig Site
10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Kids Site

Kids can experience the mystique of the Mayan culture. Learn the process of archaeology and how to use special tools to search for evidence of the ancient Maya. "Unearth” artifacts by digging in the ruins of a pyramid. Discover the meaning of the Mayan language by matching hieroglyphics on the Glyphs Wall. See Maya artifacts from the Gilcrease collection, enjoy interactive computer games and have fun at the coloring station and artifacts cart. For ages 3 - 15.


Summer Art Camp Exhibition
10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Creative Learning Center

The Summer Art Camp Exhibition showcases a sampling of works that campers from the museum’s art camps (held at the museum and the Henry Zarrow Center for Art and Education) created. Ages range from 5 to 12. Campers used a variety of media to create their works of art: drawing, painting, printmaking, clay, glass, found objects and more.


Free Art Expression
10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Gilcrease Museum, Creative Learning Center

Visitors of all ages may drop-in and explore their own creativity by making art from a variety of materials. Supplies will be set up for sculpture, painting, drawing, collage and textile explorations for self-directed art making. Visitors can work at their own speed creating works of art to take home.


Art Hunt
Noon – 4 p.m.
Helmerich Hall

Explore the galleries and gardens of Gilcrease Museum and test your observation skills and knowledge as you hunt for answers to clues and questions. Saturday’s hunt will take place in the Focus on Favorites exhibition. On Sunday, visitors will hunt through the new exhibition, Alexandre Hogue: An American Visionary – Paintings and Works on Paper. Or, enjoy the museum’s gardens with a Garden Scavenger Hunt that will lead visitors through Stuart Park. For ages 3-15.


Art Projects
Noon – 4 p.m.
Helmerich Center, Frances O’Hornett Great Hall

Come create a variety of art projects with us! Projects will be varied throughout the day.


Demonstration: Care and Conservation of the John Ross Papers
Noon
4 p.m.
Helmerich Center, Ann and Jack Graves Conservation Lab

The papers of the Cherokee Chief John Ross (1790-1866) serve to document pivotal moments in the tribe’s history including the Cherokee Removal period and the establishment of the Cherokee Nation in Oklahoma. The collection, which includes over 2,000 handwritten documents and letters, is a significant resource for scholars and tribe members. In 2013, a project to catalogue, assess condition, rehouse, conserve and digitize these papers was undertaken to enhance their long-term preservation, as well as allow better access by scholars and researchers. Deborah Baker, conservator of books, photographs and archives, conducted the condition survey of the Ross papers and is currently working to complete conservation treatments on the documents to affect their safe handling and continued preservation. In this demonstration, visitors can view the meticulous work she is doing. Baker will be joined by Natalie Panther, history instructor at OSU-Tulsa, a member of the Cherokee Nation and part of the Ross papers preservation team. Panther will provide information on the Ross papers as Baker works, answer questions about the documents, the conservation project, and importance of Ross to the Cherokee people. Baker will also provide an overview of the work that she is doing and take time to answer questions.


Fall Reflection Tree
Noon – 4 p.m.
Helmerich Hall

Join in the fun of creating a giant tree “leaf by leaf” inside Gilcrease Museum. Families can create, carve and cut out brilliant copper leaves to attach to a fall tree in Helmerich Hall to add their artistic mark to the museum. For all ages.


Maps and Compasses
Noon – 3 p.m., Hourly
Helmerich Center, Frances O’Hornett Great Hall

Join Scout Master Ron Hart and a select group of scouts from Boy Scout Troop I - First Presbyterian Church, as they lead visitors in age-appropriate map and compass skills and games. They will offer an indoor orientation about maps and compasses, two outdoor activities, plus some “extra credit” activities for children who want to learn more.


Baile Tierra Mestiza
Noon
Main Stage

Enjoy traditional dances of Latin America, full of color and emotion.


Dinosaur Stomping Ground, Outlaw Hideout, and Nature Preserve:
Oklahoma’s Black Mesa
Noon
Helmerich Center, Maxine and Jack Zarrow Reading Room

Through words and images, Sara Jane Richter, Ph.D., dean of Liberal Arts, Oklahoma Panhandle State University, offers information about Oklahoma’s Black Mesa country in the far western corner of the Oklahoma Panhandle. Once home to dinosaurs, ancient man, and Old West outlaws, Black Mesa attracts geologists, outdoorsmen, hikers, historians, and tourists because of the area’s beautiful natural wonders, its history, and its unique eco-system.


The History of Chocolate
Noon
Helmerich Center, PACCAR Classroom

The renowned chef Lois Ellen Frank (Kiowa) will explore the history of chocolate. Frank, a culinary anthropologist, has spent more than 20 years documenting foods and lifeways of Native American tribes from the Southwest. Her book, Foods of the Southwest Indian Nations, features traditional and contemporary recipes. It won the James Beard Award in the Americana category and was the first Native American book to win the award. She has worked with world-renowned chefs, scientists and academicians, collaborating with them to publish many culinary posters and cookbooks.


Indian Law in the 21st Century: Worcester Sovereignty Project
Noon
Helmerich Center, Susan B. and Robert W. Jackson Seminar Room

Walter R. Echo-Hawk Jr. is a lawyer, tribal judge, scholar and activist, whose legal experience includes cases on Native American religious freedom, prisoner rights, water rights, treaty rights, and reburial/repatriation rights. Echo-Hawk has worked as a lawyer for the Native American Rights Fund for more than 35 years. He was instrumental in securing passage of two federal laws that respect Indian and religious freedoms and also the repatriation of Native American remains to Indian tribes. He will discuss his work with The University of Tulsa College of Law's Worcester Sovereignty Project (WSP), designed to protect and advance tribal sovereignty.


Retracing Fictional Footsteps:
A View of the American West through the Eyes of Writer Karl May
Noon
Gallery 18

Thomas Thorisch, reference and instruction librarian at Oklahoma State University – Tulsa, will explore how Karl May (1842 – 1912), often called the Zane Grey of Germany, was a product of his times. As such May’s fictional characters and stories were the products of a particular period in history. More than 200 million copies of his works influenced generations of Germans and other Europeans and their views of the American frontier. Sentimental childhood heroes often change with time. Imagine what it is like when fiction meets reality right here in “Indian Territory.”


Sunday Draws
1 – 2:30 p.m.
Southwest and Mexican Galleries

Inspired by the paintings in the Southwest and Mexican galleries, participants will do a variety of sketching activities. Drawing artists will have the chance to hone their observations skills and learn drawing techniques by sketching a live model who will be dressed in authentic Pueblo attire. All supplies are provided, including sketchbooks and pencils to keep. For ages 8 and up.


After Appomattox: War, Trauma, and Discovery in the American West
1 p.m.
Location TBD

Presented by Randall Fuller, Chapman Professor of English, The University of Tulsa. Fuller’s professional focus is in nineteenth-century American literature and culture, and Native American literature.


Charles M. Russell: The Artist and His Archive in the Digital Age
1 p.m.
Helmerich, PACCAR Classroom

During an informal conversation, noted Russell scholar B. Byron Price, who is director of the Charles Russell Center and OU Press; and Diana Folsom, head of collection digitization at Gilcrease Museum, will compare and contrast two forms of preservation — Russell’s art and his literary and photographic archive — at the Helmerich Center. Price and Folsom will discuss how Russell preserved “the West that has passed” in stirring paintings and sculpture and how the preservation and digitization of his archive bring fresh meaning to his life and work.


Illustrating Indian Lives: Race and Difference in the Drawings of W. M. Cary
1 p.m.
Gallery 18

John Coward, associate professor of communication at TU will discuss the ways that Native Americans were portrayed in William de la Montagne Cary’s illustrations and how those depictions influenced popular perceptions.


Sue Straws
1 p.m.
Main Stage

Oklahoma Native American flautist


American Girl Doll Bingo
1 & 3 p.m.
Creative Learning Center

Kids will play a new kind of Bingo with an American Girl Doll twist, shouting out “AmGirl” instead of “bingo.” Prizes will be awarded to the winners of each game.


Cartooning with Joe “Toons”
1 & 3 p.m.
Helmerich Hall

Kids can learn to cartoon from expert Joe Jarhaus, aka Joe Toons, at these sessions for ages 6 to 12. Using step-by-step instruction/examples, they will create a cartoon (cowboy or cowgirl or horse or buffalo) to take home with them.


Storytime in the Galleries: The Horse and the Plains Indians
1:30 & 3:30 p.m.
Enduring Spirit Gallery

Dorothy Patent, author and teacher, is a lover of animals and the outdoors. Patent began a writing career focused on teaching kids about the importance of animals to our world and the special relationships animals and humans share. Patent will read from her book, The Horse and the Plains Indians: A Powerful Partnership and incorporate items on display in the museum's Enduring Spirit gallery to help children understand how the bonds between humans and animals have endured over time. Patent's books will be available for sale and signing in the Museum Store.


A Conversation with Thomas Gilcrease
2 p.m.
Tom Gilcrease Jr. Auditorium

Doug Watson portrays Thomas Gilcrease in a Chautauqua-style dialogue with Public Radio Tulsa's Rich Fisher. He will discuss the creation of the museum’s permanent collection including Gilcrease’s patronage of Acee Blue Eagle, Willard Stone, and Woody Crumbo; the purchase of the Philip Cole and Joseph Sharp collections; and anecdotes about Gilcrease’s life.


Mahenwahdose
2 p.m.
Main Stage

This “True Native American Theater” (the Muscogean meaning of Mahenwahdose) company presents storyteller Will Hill (Kabitcha Feke Sego), who will combine the tribal traditions of language, flute, drum and comedy to tell the tales of his nation.


The Papers of Principal Chief John Ross in the Gilcrease Collection
2 p.m.
Gallery 18

Duane King, Ph.D., founding director of the Helmerich Center for American Research, will lecture about John Ross (1790-1866), who not only served as principal chief of the Cherokee Nation longer than anyone else (1828-1866), but also led the people during some of the most turbulent periods in U.S. history. During his tenure, the Cherokee Nation struggled against forced removal from its original homeland, internal violence with post-removal factionalism, the unification and rebuilding of the Cherokee Nation in Indian Territory and the American Civil War. All of these major events as well as the chief’s family life are chronicled in the 11 lineal feet of the John Ross Papers in the Gilcrease Collection. Some of the most significant and thought-provoking discoveries will be examined in this presentation.


Reading Photographs: The Ghost Dance In a New Light
2 p.m.
Helmerich Center, PACCAR Classroom

Marc Carlson, librarian of Special Collections and University Archives at TU’s McFarlin Library, will explore what can be learned by examining a photograph. He will talk about how there is more to a photograph than meets the eye and demonstrate how to “read” a photo using a compelling image from the Gilcrease.


Sequoyah's Talking Leaves
2 p.m.
Helmerich Center, Susan B. and Robert W. Jackson Seminar Room

John Ross, who works in the Translation Department, Education Services for the Cherokee Nation, will discuss the Cherokee Syllabary. He will discuss how Sequoyah decided to create the Syllabary in 1809, despite the skepticism of his wife and the Cherokee people. After 12 years, Sequoyah completed the Syllabary in 1821, making the Cherokee Nation literate overnight. The Cherokee Nation embraced his written language and published the first Indian newspaper, The Cherokee Phoenix, in both Cherokee and English. After the removal to Indian Territory, the Cherokee Nation continued publishing The Cherokee Advocate, the first newspaper in Oklahoma. In the 1960s, new interest in the Cherokee language emerged, such as developing a typewriter and creating fonts for computers in the 1990s. Recently, the Cherokee Nation established a Translation Department in Education Services, which translated more than 500,000 words and phrases in four years for Google, Apple, and Microsoft.


Tattoos: Social and Sacred Art Form
2 p.m.
Helmerich Center, Maxine and Jack Zarrow Reading Room

Eric Singleton, assistant curator of anthropology for Gilcrease Museum, will discuss how for thousands of years, Native Americans used tattoos to express sacred knowledge, rites of passage, and social identity. He will explore the history of tattooing in North America using ethnographic sources from the Helmerich Center for American Research and objects from the Gilcrease Museum Archaeology Collection to detail the rise and evolution of tattooing from ancient Native America to the present.


American Girl Story Time
2 & 4 p.m.
Gilcrease Museum Store

Children can imagine living the stories of some of their favorite American Girl dolls — Felicity, Josephina, and Kaya — by listening to their adventures, then taking a story home. (Books are available for purchase in the museum store.) Kids are invited to bring their own American Girl Doll.


Coffee Rituals Throughout History
3 p.m.
Tom Gilcrease Jr. Auditorium

Ian Picco, director of coffee at Topeca Coffee, Tulsa’s only seed-to-cup coffee enterprise, will talk about the evolution of coffee in the Western Hemisphere and the various ways coffee is prepared and consumed. Picco will demonstrate Topeca Coffee preparation for participants to enjoy.


Lemonade and Cookies
3 p.m.
Thomas Gilcrease House

Join Thomas Gilcrease, portrayed by Doug Watson, on the porch of his house for lemonade and cookies.


Oklahoma is ‘Native America’ (just like it says on our license plates):
Finding Oklahoma Indian History in Gilcrease
3 p.m.
Helmerich Center, PACCAR Classroom

The Trail of Tears is well known as the forced migration route traveled by thousands of Native Americans who originally lived in the southeastern United States. Oklahoma has long been a crossroads for tribes’ relocation from other parts of the country. Brian Hosmer, H.G. Barnard Chair of Western American History, Department of History at TU, will discuss the deep and complex histories of migrations and tribal influences upon the history of Oklahoma.


Reconstructing American Narratives: Richard LaBarre Goodwin’s “The Cobbler”
3 p.m.
Gallery 18

Paintings are rich in detail, and Goodwin’s The Cobbler provides an interesting glimpse of the historical and social context of the time it was painted. Join Kirsten Olds, Assistant Professor of Art History at TU, for an enlightening discussion of this work, and learn how an artist’s canvas can tell a one-of-a-kind story. After, visit The Cobbler in the Gilcrease gallery and examine its detail more closely.


The Smithsonian and Gilcrease: Understanding the American Experience
3 p.m.
Helmerich Center, Susan B. and Robert W. Jackson Seminar Room

Michelle Delany, director, Consortium for Understanding the American Experience, and senior program officer, Office of the Under Secretary for History, Art, and Culture at the Smithsonian Institution will share her thoughts on the Gilcrease collection and what it can tell us about ourselves as research commences at the Helmerich Center for American Research. The Gilcrease Museum collection is rich in content and unique in the field. She also will share the goals of the Consortium for Understanding the American Experience and imagine ways that Gilcrease can support the Consortium's efforts and what discoveries may emerge.


Thirty Years of Writing America's Archeological History
3 p.m.
Helmerich Center, Maxine and Jack Zarrow Reading Room

W. Michael Gear and Kathleen O'Neal Gear have made a successful career of writing fictional stories based in real-world locations of archeological significance. By doing so, they entertain readers while simultaneously educating them on some of the most culturally rich places in America. This creative approach to history has allowed them to reach significantly more readers than would be possible through traditional academic journals.


Red Dirt Rangers
4 – 6 p.m.
Main Stage

Enjoy a free concert from Oklahoma’s favorite Red Dirt band featuring members Ben Han, Brad Piccolo and John Cooper.


Contact:
Melani Hamilton
melani-hamilton@utulsa.edu
918-596-2752