Consultation & Evaluation

CCRD provides low-cost consultation and evaluation to community agencies for needs assessments and program evaluations.

Upcoming Projects:

  • Disproportionate Minority Contact - TBA

Past Projects:

2013

Domestic Violence Intervention Services

The Center for Community Research and Development completed a program evaluation for a court-ordered parenting class at Domestic Violence Intervention Services (DVIS/Call Rape) of Tulsa. The program is for mothers who have had children taken away for abuse, neglect, or domestic violence. Many of the mothers taking the class were required to participate in order to regain custody of their child(ren). While the program had several goals, a few of the primary ones were to increase parenting self-efficacy and self-esteem of the women in the class. The goal of CCRD's program evaluation for this particular program was to see if any changes were occurring concerning the women's beliefs about their parenting abilities and their sense of self-worth.
 
TU's Institutional Review Board approved the project, and pre- and post-test data was collected as women entered and exited the program (the total length of the program was 16 weeks, with classes meeting once a week). Data was collected using several measures, including a demographics form, the Parenting Practices Questionnaire, and a measure assessing parental self-efficacy (The TOPSE measure). Following the data collection period, a program evaluation was completed and submitted to DVIS with all of the findings, including strengths and weaknesses of the program. Graduate students as well as several undergraduate students were able to gain hands-on experience by administering the measures at both of the time points, as well as data cleaning and exposure to running statistical analyses.

View the DVIS Program Evaluation

2013

Metropolitan Tulsa Urban League

The Center for Community Research and Development completed a program evaluation for the Metropolitan Tulsa Urban League. MTUL is an affiliate of the National Urban League, providing direct services to people in the Tulsa community through programs, advocacy, and research. MTUL focuses on four core areas: Education and Youth, Economic Development, Health and Quality of Life, and Civic Engagement. The goal of Metropolitan Tulsa Urban League is to promote Self-Sufficiency in its clients. The CCRD's program evaluation was used to determine MTUL's programmatic alignment in its goal to promote self-sufficiency. 

View the MTUL Evaluation Matrix 

2013

Jenks Schools

The Center for Community Research and Development completed a training program for Jenks school administrators. The goal of the program was to help administrators recognize lower level problematic internalizing and externalizing behaviors in children and adolescents. The training provided administrators with empirically based information and skills to aid in recognizing and distinguishing between normal emotional development and problematic behaviors.

The program was administered in a five hour training session by Dr. Joanna Shadlow and TU doctoral level graduate student, Lauren Winston. The Center for Community Research and Development plans to continue their partnership with the Jenks school system. Opportunities to partner together with other area schools on future projects and trainings is currently being explored.

Zarrow Center Program Evaluation

The Center for Community Research and Development completed a program evaluation for the Henry Zarrow Center for Art and Education outreach program. The Zarrow center had recently implemented an outreach program designed to offer Tulsa Public School students a hands-on art education experience. The goal of the program evaluation was to determine whether the Zarrow center had achieved its mission of increasing art literacy and promoting art appreciation in TPS students.

TU's Institutional Review Board approved the project and the data was collected by a TU graduate student over a 3 month period. Data was collected using multiple tools (i.e. observations, surveys, and interviews from various program affiliates). Following the data collection period, Zarrow administrators were provided comprehensive feedback of program strengths and weaknesses. The graduate student benefitted from the opportunity to apply classroom knowledge to a real world project.

The report is currently being used by the program director to adapt and improve the out reach program for future implementations.

View the Zarrow Center Program Evaluation

2012

Community Action Project

The Center for Community Research and Development completed a community surveying project for Community Action Project's Promise Neighborhoods Initiative. Over 6 survey collection weeks, surveys were collected by TU undergraduate and graduate student volunteers. TUs Institutional Review Board approved the project and students completed interview training and Human Subjects training prior to conducted the surveys. TU students benefited greatly from the project by developing survey implementation skills, experiencing local diversity, and through service learning.

TU students in True Blue Neighbors t-shirts were assigned randomly selected houses in the Kendall-Whittier and Eugene Fields Neighborhoods. A total of 32 students participated and volunteer hours varied from 4-48 hours per student. The following numbers of surveys were completed at each location: 116 Kendall-Whittier neighborhood (over a 50% response rate), 64 Eugene Fields neighborhood (over a 50% response rate), 75 Rogers High School, and 27 Webster High School.

The information from the surveys is currently being used by Community Action Project to apply for federal grants and plan interventions that will best improve the Kendall-Whittier and Eugene Fields neighborhoods.

  • PI: Brad Brummel, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Tulsa, Psychology Department
  • Co-PI: Joanna Shadlow, PhD, Applied Assistant Professor, University of Tulsa, Psychology Department

2003

Evaluation of MHA Community Action Grant, SHHHS/SAMHSA

The Mental Health Association received a Community Action Grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration Services to do two things. First, the grant supported efforts to build consensus in the community around the implementation of an overall service delivery model for youth mental health services. Second, the grant supported a needs assessment for youth mental health in Tulsa County. Results suggest that the status of children's mental health care in Tulsa County is far from the national "best practice models."

A continuum of care essentially does not exist in the current system. In many cases, the care children receive is not based on what a trained mental health professional deems necessary, rather, it appears to be guided by what Medicaid and other funding sources are willing to pay for. The model of service provision appears to be focused on acute, time-limited, and restrictive care.

The current level of funding is not adequate for the level of need indicated by the needs assessment. Further, it appears that funding is being appropriated to services without independent evaluation of how well the services are working. There is a considerable lack of knowledge of available services in Tulsa County. There is also a lack of information about the clientele that are currently being served, creating significant challenges in terms of determining the effectiveness of services for improving children's mental health

  • PI: Joanne Davis, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Tulsa, Psychology Department

2001

School Readiness (Community Service Council) 

This project involved the development and validation of the Early Childhood Skills Inventory, a measure of children's school readiness skills. The long-term goal is to provide community-wide information about the status of Tulsa's children when they enter school.

  • PI: Eric Daleiden, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Tulsa, Psychology Department Research Assistant: Steven DeBois

Area Prevention Resource Center - East Tulsa Prevention Coalition (Community Service Council and Oklahoma State Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services)

ETPC has been charged with reducing substance abuse among youth by 2% over a four-year time frame in the East Tulsa community. ETPC was designed to facilitate collaboration among social service agencies and the community toward the common goal of reducing substance use and related risk factors among youth in this geographic area. CCRD was the primary evaluator of this program.

  • PI: Eric Daleiden, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Tulsa, Psychology Department Research Assistant: Steven DeBois

SafeTeam School Violence Prevention Project (Mental Health Association of Tulsa and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, NIH)

CCRD helped the Mental Health Association monitor the implementation of its award-winning SafeTeam program. CCRD developed a system for tracking services delivered and for assessing the achievement of program objectives.

  • PI: Eric Daleiden, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Tulsa, Psychology Department
  • PI: Tod Sloan, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Tulsa, Psychology Department
  • Research Assistant: Teri Bourdeau

Jobs for Low Income Individuals (Tulsa Housing Authority and HUD)

This project involved the development of an elaborate series of assessments for various stages of a program linking social services to training for work in the construction industry.

  • P.I. – Deidra Schleicher, Assistant Professor, University of Tulsa, Psychology Department
  • Research Assistant: Kevin Fox

To discuss or submit a proposal, please contact: Dr. Bradley Brummel (bradley-brummel@utulsa.edu) and Dr. Joanna Shadlow (joanna-shadlow@utulsa.edu)).