Dr. Warren Booth

Warren Booth

Assistant ProfessorOliphant Hall 315
918-631-3421
warren-booth@utulsa.eduMolecular Ecology LabHome

Education and Degrees Earned

  • Ph.D. Population and Evolutionary Genetics, Queen’s University, Belfast, U.K. 2005
  • B.Sc. Genetics, Queen’s University, Belfast, U.K. 2000

Areas of Academic Specialty

  • Molecular ecology
  • Population genetics
  • Ecology, behavior, and evolution of reptiles, amphibians, mammals and invertebrates.

Areas of Research Focus

I am an integrative molecular ecologist, broadly interested in the evolutionary forces driving population differentiation and dynamics within mosaic landscapes. In particular, I am interested in the effects of ecological barriers in the absence of physical barriers, and their subsequent effect on population genetic structure within both vertebrate and invertebrate systems. I am interested in the impact factors relating to global change (i.e. habitat fragmentation, land use change, range shifts due to climatic change, human-mediated movement of invasive species) have on the distribution, genetic diversity, and genetic differentiation of native and introduced vertebrate and invertebrate species.

I am also interested in the use of molecular markers to understand the evolution of reproductive life-histories. This includes the evolution of alternate reproductive strategies in reptiles (primarily parthenogenesis and long-term sperm storage), their distribution within the phylogeny of snakes, understanding reproductive success and parentage within natural populations, and also the evolution and importance of polyandry in vertebrate and invertebrate populations. 

My research to date has spanned a broad evolutionary hierarchy ranging from the resolution of phylogenetic relationships within taxa, the determination of patterns of phylogeographic and population genetic structure within species, the elucidation of breeding systems, and the determination of genetic relatedness among individuals within populations. My research involves the development (using next generation systems) and application of molecular tools/techniques, particularly microsatellite DNA profiling, in addition to RFLP and sequencing of both mtDNA and nuclear genes.

Previous Relevant Work Experience

  • Research Associate – North Carolina State University, NC - 2010-2012
  • Postdoctoral Research Associate - North Carolina State University, NC - 2006 - 2010

Courses Taught at TU

  • Vertebrate Physiology (BIOL 3224/3220)

Publications

  • (2010) Population genetic structure of the German Cockroach
    Crissman, J*., Booth, W., Santangelo, R.G., Mukha, D.V., Vargo, E.L., & Schal, C. (2010) Population genetic structure of the German cockroach, Blattella germanica, within and among apartments. Journal of Medical Entomology. 47, 553-564. (Joint first authors - Crissman & Booth)
  • Consecutive virgin births in the new world boid snake
    Booth, W., Million, L., Reynold, R.G., Burghardt, G.M., Vargo, E.L., Schal, C., Tzika, A.C. & Schuett, G.W. (2011) Consecutive virgin births in the new world boid snake, the Colombian rainbow boa, Epicrates maurus. Journal of Heredity. 102, 759-763
  • Molecular genetic evidence for alternate reproductive strategies
    Booth, W. & Schuett, G.W. (2011) Molecular genetic evidence for alternate reproductive strategies in North American pitvipers (Serpentes, Viperidae): long-term sperm storage and facultative parthenogenesis. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society. 104, 934-942
  • Evidence for viable, non-clonal but fatherless Boa constrictors
    Booth, W., Johnson, D.H., Moore, S., Schal, C. & Vargo, E.L. (2011) Evidence for viable, non-clonal but fatherless Boa constrictors.Biology Letters. 7, 253-256
  • Facultative parthenogenesis discovered in wild vertebrates
    Booth, W., Smith, C.F., Eskridge, P., Hoss, S.K., Mendelson, J. & Schuett, G.W. Facultative parthenogenesis discovered in wild vertebrates. Biology Letters
  • Genetic analysis of bed bug populations
    Saenz, V., Booth, W., Schal, C. & Vargo, E.L. (2012) Genetic analysis of bed bug populations reveals small propagule size within individual infestations but high genetic diversity across infestations from the eastern United States. Journal of Medical Entomology. 49, 865-875
  • It's easy to be urban
    It's easy to be urban: The convergent emergence of invasive life history traits in a widespread native ant. PLoS ONE, 5(2): e9194.doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0009194
  • Molecular markers reveal infestation
    Booth, W., Saenz, V.*, Santangelo, R.G., Schal, C. & Vargo, E.L. (2012) Molecular markers reveal infestation dynamics of the bed bug, Cimex lectularius, in apartment buildings. Journal of Medical Entomology. 49, 535-546
  • Polyandry by wood mice in natural populations
    Booth, W., Montgomery, W.I. & Prodöhl, P.A. (2007) Polyandry by wood mice in natural populations. Journal of Zoology. 272, 176-182
  • Population genetic structure in German cockroaches
    Booth, W., Santangelo, R.G., Vargo, E.L., Mukha, D.V. & Schal, C. (2011) Population genetic structure in German cockroaches, Blattella germanica: Differentiated islands in an agricultural landscape. Journal of Heredity. 102, 175-183