Memories of Dr. Kermit Brown

Monday, January 04, 2010

Please pass on my condolences to Dr. Brown's family.  Dr. Brown helped me enormously in my career while I was a graduate student at TU, I am grateful to him for this. The industry has lost a gifted man in Dr. Brown, he cannot be replaced.

Regards,

Brian H. Samaroo

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Thank you so much for informing me of the sad news. I knew and respected Dr. Brown for many years and I am sure he will be missed by all of us. When I was giving DL talks in mid 80's in South America, many of their engineers told me that they had a complete collection of Dr. Brown's very practical books in their offices and were using them quite often. May God bless his soul.

Regards,

Sam Sarem
SPE Director, WNAR

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I remember my college visitation trip to TU in the spring of 1975. Dr. Brown took time out from his busy day to not only sit and talk with me about petroleum engineering and TU, but took the time to give me the full tour of the North Campus. Needless to say, I am a proud graduate of the University of Tulsa, Class of 1979 with a BS in Petroleum Engineering. Now 30 years into my career, I still consider Dr. Brown's classes as some of the most enjoyable time spent at TU. My thoughts and prayers go out to his family.

Jim Walcutt
EnCana Oil & Gas (USA) Inc.

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It's sad to hear of Dr. Brown's passing. Thanks for sharing the news. After 30 years I remember vividly some of the mini spot tests he would give in his Artificial Lift Class. You had to answer 20 questions and do it very quickly and there was always a bonus question that related to the petroleum industry. He made his class fun and practical. Condolences to his family.

Peter Lukong

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Please express my sympathy to the Brown family. Dr. Brown was a terrific educator and person, always down-to-earth and there to help the students, and he served on my thesis committee. It has been a long time since I was at TU, but I often think of Dr. Brown and his lectures as I pull his books off my office shelves for reference. I will remember him in my prayers.

Kindest regards,

Mike Miller (MS '82)

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We are so sorry to hear of Kermit's passing. It was most unfortunate for me that I graduated before he came to TU. But, I was able to know him through SPE and also through my continued contact with The TU PE Dept. I recall one great time about 8-9 years ago when Dr. Azar invited me and my friend Joe King (an Aggie) to ski with him and Kermit at Breckenridge. Kermit had a house there and I recall the camaraderie we had then with the single goal of enjoying the day, the snow and one another. Of course Kermit and Joe got along famously, both being Aggies and that day has always been an important memory since Joe, a very dear friend, drowned while fly fishing a few months later and now my friend Kermit has also passed from our gathering. I pray for God's blessings on the family. Kermit will be sorely missed because he genuinely liked people and made each of us feel important in his eyes.

Roy Koerner (BSPE '58)

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A sad day indeed. Please pass this on. I was a graduate student in Petroleum Engineering in the early 70's. Since my undergraduate degree was in Mechanical Engineering I had to take most of the undergrad PE course and Dr. Brown was one of my instructors. However, my most memorable thing about Dr Brown was related to me by Dr. Billy Joe Livesay, my advisor and then head of TUDRP. He told me when Dr. Brown met someone on an airplane he would strike up a conversation, exchange business cards and write that individual after the trip. I was led to believe that some of the funds he raised for the many scholarships the PE department gave at that time came about from these casual meetings. A lesson on networking long before it was called that. I now am teaching short courses for PetroSkills and his teaching principles are something that I strive to emulate.

Larry Wolfson (MS '74)

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I am extremely saddened to hear the news of Dr. Brown passing away. Sorrow fills my heart and my wife's heart at this sad moment, a sorrow that is deep and personal. Dr. Brown was special to me as he served as the co-advisor for my Ph.D. project. It was my privilege to be his student. Despite the numerous demands upon his time, he was first and foremost a devoted teacher who was always available for his students. He was also a honored friend of our family. My wife and I clearly recall the moment Dr. Brown held our little daughter in the ocean side in New Orleans when we met him in the SPE meeting there. My wife and I also recall the time Dr. Brown showed us the pictures of the fighter jet he flew in the Second World War when our family visited him and his family on a Christmas day in Tulsa. His spirit will be with us forever. 

Best regards,

Tianlu Liao
BP America, Inc., Houston

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It is really a sad situation. Being possible, please, present our condolences to the family. And, say that we pray for Dr. Brown to rest in peace while, God also gives the sufficient support to the family to accept such passage.

ecaetano

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I would like to express my sadness at the news that Dr. Brown has passed away. I had Dr. Brown in Production 1 course at The University of Tulsa in 1980. What a great teacher and what a great human being! I learned so much of the practical and fundamental lessons in Petroleum engineering from Dr. Brown. After 29 years working in the oil and gas business, I still use his text books from time to time. When I read the news from Dr. Kelkar this morning; I looked at the text books of Dr. Brown on the bookshelf and realized that even though Dr. Brown is gone, but his legacy remains. Thank you so much Dr. Brown. May God bless him for his good deeds.

Thanh B. Tran
Class of December 1981

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How very sad. He encouraged me to go into petroleum engineering over 30 years ago.

Amanda Jones 

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I remember him well. Although he was not at TU while I was there, he became a good friend and we have visited with him in Texas and Breckenridge Colorado.

Bill and Roma Wantuck, Houston

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Please pass my deepest condolence to Dr. Brown's family. His books on Artificial Lift and Nodal Analysis have been translated into Chinese and many petroleum engineers, faculties and students in China know his great books. He will be remembered forever by people in petroleum industry around the world.

Best regards,

Yula Tang

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Dr. Brown was a great influence on me. Unfortunately, I never took the chance to tell him. I'm sure I'm not the only one with a similar story.

When I graduated from a small town Oklahoma high school in the early 70's my parents were pretty poor. I worked my way through college. After attending a couple of years of Jr. College I was fortunate enough to receive an academic scholarship to OU; however, my wife and I were both working in Tulsa and needed to keep working to go to school. During the summer it became apparent that it was going to be tough for me to move to Norman. I was faced with having to put school off or be separated indefinitely from my wife.

I never thought I could afford to go to TU, but in desperation and a bit of innocent ignorance I dropped by the campus in late summer. I think it was 3-4 weeks before classes started. It appeared that no one was around. However, the engineering office building (north campus at the time) was open, so I just wondered the halls to see if I could find anyone. I saw a man in an office either reading or doing some paperwork....I walked conspicuously back and forth outside his office a few times until he finally asked... "Young man, can I help you with something?" Then he invited me into his office. He introduced himself as Kermit Brown. I did not know him or anything about him, but his name was on the door, so I told him my story. He seemed to not only quickly understand my predicament, but really empathized with where I was. He asked if I had transcripts, and OU scholarship evidence with me. Fortunately I had brought all my information with me, and showed it to him. After reviewing it a few moments, he looked at me and said, "Son, if you will go to the administration office and registrar right now, I will call them and get you a scholarship today. You just have to promise me that you will enroll today, and that you will work to do your best at school, since TU is likely a bit tougher than your Jr. College was." I was shocked at what he had offered me, and hesitated a moment. He seemed to sense my surprise. Then he smiled at me and said "I guess it just depends; do you want a great engineering education, or do you want to watch top ten football?" That was all it took...I was in. I'll never forget what he did in a few minutes for a young, inexperienced country boy.

My best wishes to his family and all who knew him...a great man.

Terry Carter

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I am truly sorry to hear this. I consider myself extremely fortunate to have experienced his teaching first hand. My strongest memory is of a class on artificial lift. He insisted the students create binders to hold class notes, examples and homework problems. He knew that, done correctly, they would provide a useful reference for anyone responsible for doing those calculations over the course of their career. As Mohan pointed out, it wasn't about the grade; he was dedicated to teaching people how to actually engineer solutions. One day I hope to teach. I hope I will be as effective as he was.

Kind Regards,

Mark Dykstra

Contact:
Petroleum Engineering Dept.
(918) 631-2533