University Events Calendar

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After Appomattox: War, Trauma, and Discovery in the American West »

September 07 at 01:00 pm to 02:00 pm

Part of the Helmerich Center Opening Weekend Celebration Presented by Randall Fuller, Chapman Professor of English, The University of Tulsa. Fuller's professional focus is in nineteenth-century American literature and culture, and Native American literature.

Illustrating Indian Lives: Stereotypes and Differences in the Drawings of W. M. Cary »

September 07 at 01:00 pm to 02:00 pm

Part of the Helmerich Center Opening Weekend Celebration John Coward, associate professor of communication at TU will discuss the ways that Native Americans were portrayed in William de la Montagne Cary’s illustrations and how those depictions influenced popular perceptions.

The Papers of Principal Chief John Ross in the Gilcrease Collection »

September 07 at 01:00 pm to 02:00 pm

Part of the Helmerich Center Opening Weekend Celebration Duane King, Ph.D., founding director of the Helmerich Center for American Research, will lecture about John Ross (1790-1866), who not only served as principal chief of the Cherokee Nation longer than anyone else (1828-1866), but also led the people during some of the most turbulent periods in U.S. history.

Storytime in the Galleries: "The Horse and the Plains Indians" I »

September 07 at 01:30 pm to 02:00 pm

Part of the Helmerich Center Opening Weekend Celebration Dorothy Patent will read from her book, "The Horse and the Plains Indians: A Powerful Partnership" and incorporate items on display in the museum's Enduring Spirit gallery to help children understand how the bonds between humans and animals have endured over time. 1:30 & 3:30 p.m.

Sequoyah's Talking Leaves »

September 07 at 02:00 pm to 03:00 pm

Part of the Helmerich Center Opening Weekend Celebration John Ross, who works in the Translation Department, Education Services for the Cherokee Nation, will discuss the Cherokee Syllabary. He will discuss how Sequoyah decided to create the Syllabary in 1809, despite the skepticism of his wife and the Cherokee people. After 12 years, Sequoyah completed the Syllabary in 1821, making the Cherokee Nation literate overnight.

A Conversation with Thomas Gilcrease »

September 07 at 02:00 pm to 03:00 pm

Part of the Helmerich Center Opening Weekend Celebration Doug Watson portrays Thomas Gilcrease in a Chautauqua-style dialogue with Public Radio Tulsa's Rich Fisher. He will discuss the creation of the museum's permanent collection including Gilcrease's patronage of Acee Blue Eagle, Willard Stone, and Woody Crumbo; the purchase of the Philip Cole and Joseph Sharp collections; and anecdotes about Gilcrease's life.

Mahenwahdose »

September 07 at 02:00 pm to 03:00 pm

Part of the Helmerich Center Opening Weekend Celebration This "True Native American Theater" (the Muscogean meaning of Mahenwahdose) company presents storyteller Will Hill (Kabitcha Feke Sego), who will combine the tribal traditions of language, flute, drum and comedy to tell the tales of his nation.

American Girl Story Time I »

September 07 at 02:00 pm to 03:00 pm

Part of the Helmerich Center Opening Weekend Celebration Children can imagine living the stories of some of their favorite American Girl dolls – Felicity, Josephina, and Kaya – by listening to their adventures, then taking a story home. (Books are available for purchase in the museum store.) Kids are invited to bring their own American Girl Doll. 2:00 & 4:00 p.m.

Reading Photographs: The Ghost Dance In a New Light »

September 07 at 02:00 pm to 03:00 pm

Part of the Helmerich Center Opening Weekend Celebration Marc Carlson, librarian of Special Collections and University Archives at TU's McFarlin Library, will explore what can be learned by examining a photograph. He will talk about how there is more to a photograph than meets the eye and demonstrate how to "read" a photo using a compelling image from the Gilcrease.

Tattoos: Social and Sacred Art Form »

September 07 at 02:00 pm to 03:00 pm

Part of the Helmerich Center Opening Weekend Celebration Eric Singleton, assistant curator of anthropology for Gilcrease Museum, will discuss how for thousands of years, Native Americans used tattoos to express sacred knowledge, rites of passage, and social identity.