Department of Special Collections and University Archives
McFarlin Library. University of Tulsa.  2933 E. 6th St.  Tulsa, OK.  74104-3123 (OKT - OkTU)


Joseph Mora - Hopi Indian photographs

Collection 1976-007

Dates:  1904-1906.

Extent:  (3 boxes).

Level of Description:  Item level.

Name of creator(s):  Joseph Mora.

Date of creation:  Undetermined.

Scope and Content:   Consists of 140 sepia-toned photographic prints and 27 black and white photographic prints (originally housed in a 3-ring binder labeled "Western Art Productions, Inc. Jo Mora's Watercolor Collections of Hopi Kachina & Ceremonial Figures").  All photographs were produced from the original negatives taken by Mora from 1904 through 1906.  Many of these photographs appear in The Year of the Hopi:  Paintings and Photographs by Joseph Mora, 1904-06 (Smithsonian Institution: Washington, DC, 1979), the companion book to a traveling exhibition organized and circulated by The Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, 1979-1981.  The photographs in this collection retain the numbering system given them for the Smithsonian exhibition and are arranged chronologically. The page on which a photograph appears in The Year of the Hopi:  Paintings and Photographs by Joseph Mora, 1904-06 is noted in (  ).  Exhibit/book captions appear in italics.

Administrative/Biographical History:  In 1986, John "Jack" Wilson donated to Northern Arizona University 613 photographs and original Mora negatives (including most or all of the images in the Tulsa collection).  To respect the strong feelings the Hopi Tribe has expressed concerning publication of photographs depicting ceremonies, Northern Arizona University has agreed to refer requests for duplication of images of Hopi religious ceremonies to the Hopi Cultural Preservation Office.  The Wilson gift is administered by the Special Collections and Archives Department at the Cline Library, Northern Arizona University, P.O.  Box 6022, Flagstaff, AZ 86011-6022.

Access and Copyright:  This material is housed off-site and will require special arrangements for anticipated use. Contact the Department of Special Collections.

Language and Scripts:  English.

Finding aid/Inventory:  Finding aid is available online.

Provenance/Source of Acquisition:   The Wilson gift is administered by the Special Collections and Archives Department at the Cline Library, Northern Arizona University, P.O.  Box 6022, Flagstaff, AZ 86011-6022.  The provenance of the black and white photographs is not known; however, their identification numbers correspond to the Smithsonian exhibit photos and most are marked  "Museum of Man", the anthropological museum in San Diego, California.

Date(s) of description:   Sidney F. Huttner, Oct 1995; rev. Milissa Burkart, Oct 2006.
 

Access Points:

Subject Headings 

 
Personal names 


Corporate names

Places
 


Inventory

Box 1
Photo no.      
74 Indian police. Oraibi Snake Dance. 1 b/w print.    
       
86 Unidentified seated woman. 1 b/w print.    
       
102 Howenai maidens dance (page 75). 1 sepia print.
Two Howenai maidens face the chorus as they dance.
   
       
111 Howenai ceremony. 1 sepia print.
This November day in 1904 was cold and the audience is wrapped in blankets and overcoats against the weather.
   
       
114 Howenai ceremony. 1 sepia print..
The Howenai dance follows a series of positions wherein the young men do not move and the two girls pass through and around the group.
   
       
115 Howenai ceremony. 1 sepia print.
As the group of young men move into the plaza, two of the Howenai'Manas move through them. They are joined by a chorus of older men.
   
       
116 Howenai men hurl clothing, food, and dishes from roof to the audience below (page 76). 1 sepia print.
The Howenai men hurl clothing, food and dishes to the audience who scramble to possess them in the plaza below.
   
       
118 Young men of Shungopovi enter the plaza during the Howenai ceremony (page 75). 1 sepia print.
The young men of Shungopovi who will dance in the Howenai begin their entrance into the plaza led by the chorus leader with his banner.
   
       
119 Howenai ceremony. 1 sepia print, 1 b/w print.
The male Howenai dancers climb to the roof tops of Shungopovi to fling their gifts to the waiting crowd in the plaza.
   
       
120 1 b/w print.    
       
121 1 b/w print.    
       
122 Kaletaka (war chiefs) with Howenai maidens near the Tao Kiva in Shungopovi (page 73). 1 sepia print, 1 b/w print.
The two Kaletaka or war chiefs help ready one set of Howenai maidens near the Tao Kiva in Shungopovi.
   
       
123 Howenai ceremony. 1 sepia print, 1 b/w print.
The chorus circles within the plaza followed by the two Howenai'Manas and the two Kaletakas.
   
       
124 Howenai Manas dance before the Kaletaka (page 74). 1 sepia print, 1 b/w print.
Within the movements of the dance the chorus and the two Kaletaka kneel while a set of the Howenai'Manas dance and gesture before them.
   
       
125  Howenai ceremony. 1 sepia print, 1 b/w print.
The group of young men occupy the west end of the Shungopovi village plaza with the chorus forming the first line while onlookers crowd the roof tops.
   
       
130 Howenai ceremony. 1 sepia print. 1 b/w print.
As each set of the Howenai finishes the give-away begins and the audience moves in closer.
   
       
131 Buffalo (Mosairu Tikive) ceremony. 1 sepia print, 1 b/w print.
The Buffalo Boy and Maid, followed by the chorus gesturing and singing spiritedly, enter the plaza. The antler in the hand of the Buffalo Youth indicates that this is a Third Mesa Dance.
   
       
132 Buffalo (Mosairu Tikive) ceremonial dancers (page 34). 1 sepia print, 1 b/w print.
Assembled in a line facing to the south, the costumes of the Buffalo Dancers are clearly visible.
   
       
133 Related to 134-136. 1 sepia print.
As the dance group turns through its directional facings the turquoise-colored sun shield with radiating turkey feathers and pendent red horse-hair is clearly visible on the girl's back.
   
       
134 Moenkopi troupe performs a Buffalo Dance at Oraibi (page 34). 1 sepia print.
The Moenkopi troupe gives a Buffalo Dance in Oraibi. Usually if a dance is very popular it may appear in more than one village.
   
       
135 Moenkopi group performs a Buffalo Dance at Oraibi (page 35). 1 sepia print.   
As the chorus gestures vociferously the males pass between the females in one of the dancing positions.
   
       
136 Moenkopi group performs a Buffalo Dance at Oraibi (page 34). 1 sepia print.   
The visiting Moenkopi dancers perform in Oraibi in August of 1904, the day after the Snake Dance.
   
       
137a 1 b/w print.    
       
140 [Snake dance]. 1 b/w print.    
       
142 Snake priests dance with reptiles in their mouths (page 71). 1 sepia print.
The Snake priests or warriors dancing with the reptiles in their mouths. The rattles may be clearly seen on the snake held under the arm of the closest Antelope priest.
   
       
142a Related to 142. 1 b/w print.    
       
145 1 sepia print.
The Antelope priests file into the plaza and begin their circuit in front of the kisi or cottonwood bower where the snakes are kept.
   
       
147 Member of the Snake Clan approaches the Snake Kiva (page 70). 1 sepia print.
An older woman of the Snake Clan approaches the Snake Kiva. The large jars are used inside of the kiva to keep the snakes during the time they are being gathered before the ceremony.
   
       
149 Snake ceremony. 1 sepia print.
The procession of Snake priests into the plaza places them in a position facing the Antelope priests and the kisi.
   
       
152 Flute ceremony. 1 sepia print.
With the Kaletaka still in the lead the procession lacks the three flute personages and the chief who are undoubtedly performing the cloud-drawing ritual on the terrace above.
   
       
155 Kaletaka (warrior) leads a procession upwards along the mesa flank during the Flute ceremony (pages 68-69). 1 sepia print.
The Kaletaka leads the procession upwards along the mesa flank as the chief asperges at specific locations along the route.
   
       
157 Flute ceremony. 1 sepia print.
Entering the village of Old Oraibi, The Flute Chief again draws a cloud as the Flute Society personages await beyond him.
   
       
158 Processions from the spring towards the village during the Flute ceremony (page 70). 1 sepia print.
The procession wends its way up from the spring toward the village with the Cloud Chief leading followed by the Flute Maidens and Youth, the standard bearers and finally the flute players.
   
       
163 Kaletaka (warrior) stand guard at the spring during the Flute ceremony (page 67). 1 sepia print.
The Kaletaka or warrior stands guard at the edge of the spring holding the flute natci or symbol across his left arm.
   
       
166 Group of kachinas. Soyal ceremony (page 32). 1 sepia print.   
The kachina groups moves forward a pace at a time pausing at each step to sing. This is repeated six times at the Chief Kiva, again in the main plaza and once more at the north end of the village.
   
       
167 Related to 192. 1 sepia print.
These corn bundles, which have been stacked in the Mong Kiva with the masks of Ahűlani and his sisters resting on them overnight, are now consecrated. The women take the ears home to use for first seed corn and to improve the quality of the corn stored in their homes.
   
       
168 Related to 173. 1 sepia print.
Returning in the same slow procession they are again greeted at the Chief Kiva by Supela. As Soyal Chief, Supela takes from each kachina their corn bundles passing them to specific members of the Patki clan.
   
       
170 Mana with basket of corn (page 31). 1 sepia print.   
Each maiden or mana carries a ceremonial basket of corn, a flat wicker tray. This plaque is supported by strong rods which the kachin'mana grasps. The carefully bound corn ears stand upright in a circle on a bed of spruce boughs around a center of raw cotton.
   
       
171 Kachinas Ahulani, Sika Mana, and Sakwap Mana. Soyal ceremony (page 30). 1 sepia print, 1 b/w print. Captions: 
In the early afternoon of mid-December, three kachinas appear beside the Chief (Mong) Kiva at Walpi. They are Ahűlani in the center with his two 'sisters'. Yellow Corn Girl (Sikya Mana) stands at his right and Blue Corn Girl (Sakwap mana) on his left.
   
       
172 Kachinas return to the Underworld after blessing the corn. Soyal ceremony (page 33). 1 sepia print.   
Having completed their blessing of the corn crop for the coming year, the kachinas disappear down into the kiva to return to the Underworld.
   
       
173 Supela, the Soyal Chief pictured with Manas at the Mong Kiva (page 31). 1 sepia print.
Supela, the old Soyal chief, emerges from the Mong Kiva at the west end of Walpi to cast corn meal over the kachinas as he prays. The two manas now hold their distinctive corn bundles as they prepare for their procession through the village.
   
       
177 Heheya Aumutaka (Tu-Uqti). Niman ceremony (page 60). 1 sepia print.
With the Kuwan Heheya kachinas comes their 'uncle' variously called Heheya Aumutaka or Tu-uqti.
   
       
178 Alo Manas make rhythmic sounds on box and pumpkin shell during the Niman ceremony (page 60). 1 sepia print.
The white-faced Alo'Manas kneel on blankets spread for them and hoding a notched stick in one hand and resting it on a box or pumpkin shell they scrape an animal shoulder blade across it to produce a rhythmic sound.
   
       
179 Heheya Aumutaka (Tu-Uqti). Niman ceremony (page 61). 1 sepia print.
Tu-uqti postures and gestures as he dances back and forth in front of the Kuwan Heheya in his fancy clothes.
   
       
181 Kuwan Heheya dancers on the plaza a Walpi. Niman ceremony (page 62). 1 sepia print.
A line of the green-faced Kuwan Heheya line the plaza at Walpi and begin their dance as the Alo'Manas kneel and rasp before them. Hano clowns gather to watch them dance.
   
       
182 Kaletak Mana. 1 sepia print.
Alo'Mana is a kachina girl that supposedly originated in Zuni and has been imported via Hano on First Mesa to other Hopi villages. She is always impersonated by a man.
   
       
183 Plaza ceremony line dance. 1 sepia print.
Pausing for lunch at midday away from the view of the villagers, the kachinas remove their masks and gather about their meal.
   
       
185 Related to 186. 1 sepia print.
Flanked by two Ota the Wukoqőte, or Broad-Headed Kachina, appears with this group as a side dancer.
   
       
186 Ota line dancers with Alo Mana during the Plaza ceremony (page 50). 1 sepia print.
The Ota line dancers are accompanied by Alo'Mana, the white-faced kachina girl, and a side dancer.
   
       
187 Wuwuchim ceremony. 1 sepia print.
The prepared food is taken to the men in the kivas and passed down to them through the hatchway.
   
       
188 Wuwuchim men on the Chief Kiva (page 26). 1 sepia print.
Standing on the Chief kiva the Wuwuchim men gather for their circuit of the village dressed in their ceremonial finery.
   
       
189 One-Horned Society meal beggars. 1 sepia print, 1 b/w print.
One of the One-Horned Society men dressed in his ceremonial costume approaches each house asking for corn meal for use ;during the Wuwuchim. Usually these meal 'beggars' or pages pass through the town in pairs.
   
       
190 Women gathered outside their houses at Walpi. Wuwuchim ceremony (page 25). 1 sepia print.
At Walpi, the women gather outside of their houses preparing food for the men in the kivas during the Wuwuchim ceremony.
   
       
191 Two-horned society members. Wuwuchim ceremony (page 24). 1 sepia print.
A pair of the Two-Horned Society members stride along on their way from Sichomivi to Walpi dressed in Traditional horned helmets and buckskin robes. They carry their cornmeal in the flat Havasupai trays.
   
       
192 Women of the village retrieve their bundles of corn from the Chief Kiva (page 33). 1 sepia print.
The day before Ahűlani and his two sisters appeared, each woman in the village had taken a carefully tied bundle of corn ears to the Chief Kiva. After the kachinas leave, the corn bundles are brought up from the kiva and spread out on blankets where each woman retrieves her particular corn ears.
   
       
193 Wuwuchim men in the plaza (page 27). 1 sepia print.
As Wuwuchim men move through the plaza each grasps his ear of corn in his left hand and with it his neighbor's right hand. thus linked they dance obliquely along a set path through the village.
   
       
194 1 b/w print.    
       
195 Wuwuchim men (page 28). 1 sepia print.
A group of Wuwuchim men mock a woman who probably belongs to the women's society that is a counterpart of their own. She in turn taunts them and douses them with any variety of foul water that comes to hand.
   
       
196 Wuwuchim ceremonial dancers (page 29). 1 sepia print.
Old and young alike, each society member steps out his rhythms in observation of this ceremonial duties to his town and to all Hopi.
   
       
197 Wuwuchim ceremony. 1 sepia print.
Past kivas and through plazas along the ritually prescribed route the dancing society members move to song and step that are centuries old.
   
 
Box 2
Photo no.      
200 Clowns act up on a roof-top during the Chakwaina ceremony (page 46). 1 sepia print.
A line of Mudhead Clowns files over the rooftops in the plaza to the amusement of the audience. Clown groups invariably enter the dance area in this manner surmounting all obstacles as though they were incredible precipices.
   
       
201 Clowns act up on a roof-top during the Chakwaina ceremony (page 46). 1 sepia print, 1 b/w print.
Accompanying most kachina dances in the spring are clowns who perform when the kachinas go out to rest at intervals during the day. Their entry is always made over the roof tops and down to the plaza, encountering mock problems along the way. Every obstacle, onlookers, walls or pebbles, is insurmountable without loud discussion and many false tries.
   
       
205 Related to 206. 1 sepia print.
The Koyemsi continue on to challenge the men in a contest that is based on strength or agility. In this instance the man has been given a large rock to lift over his head. If he succeeds he will receive food as a prize. The Koyemsi, meanwhile, keep up an incessant stream of absurd remarks and jibes at the contestant to make him lose.
   
       
206 Koyemsi (Mudheads) attempt head stands in a mud puddle during the Chakwaina ceremony (page 48). 1 sepia print, 1 b/w print.
Upon reaching the plaza the clowns engage in horse play to amuse the audience while the kachinas absent themselves to rest. Some of these antics have deeper significance, for the Koyemsi or Mudhead is a sacred figure. A row of Mudheads watch one of their members attempt a head stand in a mud puddle.
   
       
  Supela with Koshare (striped clowns) and Alo'Manas. 1 sepia print.    
       
215 Related to 223. 1 sepia print.
The Koshare are often called Hano Clowns because the Tewa people of that village presumably introduced them among the Hopi. They are gathered about their spruce tree 'house' at one end of the plaza.
   
       
218 Related to 223. 1 sepia print.
The Koshare are also called Gluttons because they eat everything and in huge quantities. They are intimidating a Chuku who attempts to join their group.
   
       
219 Koyemsi (Mudheads) attempt head stands in a mud puddle during the Chakwaina ceremony. 1 sepia print.
The Koyemsi are allowed total freedom and are not to be prohibited in their actions. Catching one of the Chakwaina dancers they are dunking him in a mud puddle by sitting on his back and splashing water over him.
   
       
221 Koyemsi (Mudheads) attempt head stands in a mud puddle during the Chakwaina ceremony. 1 sepia print.
Girls are lured into the mud puddle by the Koyemsi who holds out prizes that must be wrested from him. This results in the girls becoming covered with mud, a symbol of fertility among the Hopi.
   
       
223 Koshare (striped clowns). Plaza ceremony (page 49). 1 sepia print, 1 b/w print.
The Koshare, the striped clowns, are being aided in an unorthodox tug of war by a Chuku or Hopi clown.
   
       
225 Women dance in the plaza at the Sichomovi village during the Lakone ceremony (page 78). 1 sepia print.
Within the plaza, at the adjoining village of Sichomovi, the women circle in their bright costumes as the dance proceeds.
   
       
226 Lakon Manas in the plaza at Walpi on First Mesa (page 79). 1 sepia print.    
       
230 Lakon Manas remove objects from blankets for distribution (page 78). 1 sepia print.
Removing objects from the blankets in which they have carried them from the kiva, the Lakon'Manas prepare to distribute them.
   
       
232 Black Ogres. 1 sepia print.
Two Nataskas, one black and the other white, keep up a constant stamping step as they await the proceedings. Jaws yawn and shut and deep growls accompany the clanking of the rattles on their legs.
   
       
233 Soyoko ceremony. 1 sepia print.
Standing with her cohort, the Black ogre, the Soyok'Mana stands ready for her burden of meat. Her hands holding the head band of the burden basket are reddened to the wrist with blood, presumably of youngsters.
   
       
234 Black Ogres and Soyok Mana await food outside a First Mesa house. 1 sepia print, 1 b/w print.
The Black Ogre and Soyok'Mana patiently await food outside a First Mesa house. (Possibly delete)
   
       
235 Soyoko ceremony. 1 sepia print.
Clustering together the Soyokos approach a kiva that has attracted their attention. The Heheyas coil their ropes in anticipation as Hahai-i Wuhti approaches the kiva.
   
       
236 Hahani-i Wuhti, Black Nataska, and Soyok Mana (page 44). 1 sepia print, 1 b/w print.
Approaching a house Hahai-i Wuhti in red and white robe and the principal Black Nataska approach the door with Soyok'Mana. Two other Black Nataskas and a White Nataska or Wiharu remain a little distance away clacking and bobbing. Near the porch two Heheya ready bags for carrying away their loot.
   
       
237 Hahai-i Wuhti kneels before a Hopi boy and his mother. Soyoko ceremony (page 45). 1 sepia print.
Hahai-i Wuhti, Mother of the Soyokos, kneels before a struggling Hopi boy who clutches his mother as the other Soyokos crowd about.
   
       
238 Soyoko ceremony. 1 sepia print.
The Soyoko Group emerges from a kiva on First Mesa to begin their trip around the village. One Heheya has just emerged from the kiva by ladder and obscures Hahai-i Wuhti. The Black Ogre (Nataska) and Soyok'Mana stand waiting in the village plaza.
   
       
239 Soyoko ceremony. 1 sepia print.
The Soyoko procession temporarily surrounds E.A. Burbank, an early artist, as he attempts to enter a house on First Mesa. Undoubtedly the Nataskas or Black Ogres are roaring their disapproval of this maneuver.
   
       
240 Soyok'Mana. 1 sepia print.    
       
241 Soyoko ceremony. 1 sepia print.    
       
242 Black Ogres. 1 sepia print.
Hahai-i Wuhti carrying her water gourd stands at a doorway and in a high falsetto addresses her demands to the occupants of the house while a threatening Black Ogre stands by.
   
       
243 Soyoko ceremony. 1 sepia print.
The procession winds its way through the villages on First Mesa, the men approaching every house without fail as they make their collections of food. Village life goes on as soon as they have passed.
   
       
244 Black Ogres. 1 sepia print.
Standing at a doorway the two Heheya hop about occasionally trying to rope someone and often being called forward to check the sweet cornmeal that some frightened girl has thrust forward as her ransom from the hideous crew. (Possibly delete)
   
       
245 Soyoko ceremony. 1 sepia print.
Burdened with loot in their carrying bags two of the Heheya pass the Black Nataskas on their way back to the kiva while Soyok'Mana and the other Nataska proceed on to other houses.
   
       
246 Heneya Mana and Soyok Wuhti pictured with Black Ogres, Soyok Mana and Hahai-i Wuhti (page 42). 1 sepia print.
Surrounding the kiva Heheya'Mana and Soyok'Wuhti peer down the hatch while the Black Ogres and Soyok'Mana listen to Hahai-i Wuhti call down to the kiva chief to bring them fresh meat or they will take him.
   
       
247 Related to 265. 1 sepia print.
Soyok'Wuhti and another of the Soyokos grasp the kiva chief by the arm and attempt to drag him from the kiva as Hahai-i Wuhti watches quietly.
   
       
249 Related to 226. 1 sepia print.
The circle of women is joined by two Lakon'Manas in their elaborate costumes and beautiful head pieces.
   
       
249a Lakon Manas in the plaza at Walpi on First Mesa. 1 sepia print.
A Lakon'Mana throws a basket toward the audience with all of her might.
   
       
249c Lakon Manas in the plaza at Walpi on First Mesa. 1 sepia print.
The women bow and dip in time with the rhythm of their songs, as they gesture with their baskets.
   
       
249e Men attempt to catch a basket thrown by a Lakon Mana (page 81). 1 sepia print.
When the basket falls every nearby man attempts to catch it or wrest it from his neighbor. Eventually possession is retained by one man although frequently his prize is severely damaged in the struggle.
   
       
250 Plaza ceremony mixed dance. 1 sepia print.    
       
[253] 1 sepia print.
A Badger, Kowako or Rooster, Sio Ahote, Hochani, Ohoho, Takawea or Hen Kachina and Avachhoya form part of this line of Mixed Kachinas.
   
       
255 Akush, Mashanta, Auchhoya and Takawea (page 51). 1 sepia print.
Akush, the First Mesa Kaletaka, follows Mashanta, Avachhoya and Takawea in the line as a Hummingbird or Tocha appears behind them as a side dancer.
   
       
259 Plaza ceremony mixed dance. 1 sepia print.
A line of Mixed Kachinas enters the plaza at Hano passing by a kachina father who sprinkles them with cornmeal. They dance to the beat of a Mudhead who pounds a folded buckskin as a drum.
   
       
262 Plaza ceremony line dance. 1 sepia print.
A line of Ota, the First Mesa Skirt Man, enters the plaza to begin their performance.
   
       
264 Soyok Wuhti with crook in hand (page 45). 1 sepia print.
Soyok'Wuhti, the Ogre Woman, stands before the door of a house with her crook in hand. This crook is often used to try and catch a youngster's leg to draw him out of the house. Long tangled hair hangs matted about her head and from under this mp glare two circular yellow eyes.
   
       
265 Kiva chief emerges to confront Soyok Wuhti (page 43). 1 sepia print.
The kiva chief emerges to confront the hideous Soyok'Wuhti and argue with her about her demands.
   
       
269 Onlookers line the roofs of houses to watch kachinas dance during the Chakwaina ceremony (page 47). 1 sepia print.
Onlookers line the roof of the houses around the plaza when the kachinas dance. Their elaborate sashes are clearly visible as the line turns to dance facing the direction from which they came. This is a successful dance, for rain has fallen on the village and lies in pools in the plaza.
   
       
270 Chakwaina Kachina dancers. 1 sepia print.
The kachinas dance on each side of the plaza, lining up and singing a complete song, then filing counterclockwise to the next position. They are conducted from one position to another by the kachina priest who stands next to the drummer.
   
       
271 Chakwaina Kachina dancers. 1 sepia print.
The Chakwaina Kachina may appear in a variety of forms, many of which are visible in this line. Fourth from the left is Heoto, the invincible warrior, sixth in line is the Chakwaina side dancer with the bulging eyes while the seventh is the white Chakwaina or albino.
   
       
272 Related to 271. 1 sepia print.
The line of Chakwaina dancers entering the main plaza of Old Oraibi is led by two young boys who have but recently been initiated into the Kachina Cult as evidenced by their size.
   
       
274 Chakwaina Kachina dancers. 1 sepia print.
The Palhik'Mana dance is one of the most beautiful dances performed by the Hopi because of the costume, tableta and movement.
   
       
276 Related to 274. 1 sepia print.
Dancing abreast, the line of Palhik'Manas' headdresses resembles clouds with their long black hair falling like rain below the tabletas.
   
       
277 Chakwaina Kachina dancers (page 85). 1 sepia print.
The Palhiko daancers move in line with the male in the center as they perform in the Walpi plaza.
   
       
281 Unidentified village and kivas. 1 sepia print.    
       
283 Unidentified Hopi village. 1 sepia print.    
       
284 Plaza ceremony mixed dance. 1 sepia print.    
       
288 Plaza ceremony mixed dance. 1 sepia print.    
       
298 1 b/w print.    
       
299 Doorway at Walpi (page 14).    
       
Box 3      
Photo no.      
300 Unidentified village and kivas. 1 sepia print.    
       
312 Pendetye Kiva in the Tewa village of Hano on First Mesa (page 10-11) 1 sepia print.    
       
397 1 b/w print.    
       
404 Joseph Mora on his horse, "Spud", at Polacca, Arizona (page 2). 1 sepia print.    
       
406 Joseph Mora pictured with companions. 1 sepia print.    
       
410 Joseph Mora at Keams Canyon. 1 sepia print.    
       
416 Joseph Mora at Polacca House. 1 sepia print.    
       
425 Side dancers for the Mamzrau dance (page 83). 1 sepia print.
Accompanying every Mamzrau dance are two 'side dancers' called warriors or wauhitaka. These women in elaborate coronets throw small arrows at corn husk packets which they pitch before them.
   
       
426 Mamzrau ceremony. 1 sepia print.
The wearing of the man's short kilt formerly caused the women who were wauhitaka much embarrassment and also gave the Mamzrau its nickname of 'Knee High Dance'.
   
       
430 Women of the Mamzrau (page 82). 1 sepia print.
Women of the Mamzrau gather about or scurry away on secret missions from the Horn Kiva at Walpi. Marau'vaho, the hand sticks, lean against the kiva hatchway in readiness for the dance.
   
       
431 Women of the Mamzrau; detail of prayer boards seen in 430. 1 sepia print.
Marau'vaho or prayer boards of the Mamzrau lean against the kiva hatch and lie upon the wood supply. Most of these boards have designs that incorporate in some aspect clouds, corn or kachinas.
   
       
432 Mamzrau ceremony. 1 sepia print.
The Mamzrau women enter the plaza at Walpi on the ninth day and form an open-sided circle which is characteristic of their dance.
   
       
433 Mamzrau ceremony. 1 sepia print.
Most of the women in the Mamzrau society wear the brilliant red and white maiden robes over their dark dresses or calicos. Facing Shaliko, the chieftainess at the left is an impersonation of Chatumaka, one of the society's supernaturals.
   
       
435 Women's circle dance (page 83). 1 sepia print.
As the circle of women they step slowly to their right moving their prayer boards up and down bending as they move. Chatumaka remains facing the Mamzrau chieftainess as she back around the circle.
   
       
498 Unidentified Hopi village. 1 sepia print.    
       
500 Unidentified Hopi village. 1 sepia print.    
       
502 Unidentified Hopi village. 1 sepia print.    
       
508 Unidentified village and kivas. 1 sepia print.    
       
516 Unidentified Hopi village. 1 sepia print.    
       
517 Unidentified Hopi village. 1 sepia print.    
       
523 Shungopovi, Second Mesa, main plaza (page 8). 1 sepia print.    
       
531 Navajo. 1 sepia print.    
       
532 Navajo. 1 sepia print.    
       
536 Navajo related. 1 sepia print.    
       
537 Navajo related. 1 sepia print.    
       
538 Navajo related. 1 sepia print.    
       
540 Navajo related. 1 sepia print.    
       
541 Navajo related. 1 sepia print.    
       
542.1 Navajo related. 1 sepia print.    
       
542.2 Navajo related. 1 sepia print.    
       
543.1 Navajo related. 1 sepia print.    
       
543.1 Navajo related. 1 sepia print.    
       
544.1 Navajo related. 1 sepia print.    
       
544.2 Navajo related. 1 sepia print.    
       
545 Navajo. 1 sepia print, 1 b/w print.    
       
557 1 b/w print.    
       
No no. 2  unidentified sepia prints.    
 
Copyright 2008 McFarlin Library - The University of Tulsa. All rights reserved.
Revised: 12/08/11.

Hit Counter