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Nimrod Conference for Readers and Writers 2013
 
Friday, October 18th:
 
35th Annual Awards Ceremony and Dinner
 
6:30 p.m.
The Allen Chapman Activity Center, The University of Tulsa
 
Join Nimrod in a celebration of this year’s Literary Award Winners and Judges, featuring keynote Address by National Book Award Finalist Cristina García, music by Vintage Wildflowers, and readings by Jacob M. Appel, Sarah Crossland, Kristina Gorcheva-Newberry, and Lynn Shoemaker.
 
(Reservations and payment for the Dinner alone or for the special Two Day Pass to the Dinner and Conference must be received by October 10th.)
 
 
Saturday, October 19th:
 
Conference For Readers and Writers: Hunger and Thirst: Fulfilling Desire
 
9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Allen Chapman Activity Center, The University of Tulsa
 
9:30-10:00 a.m.: Late Registration
 
10:00-10:40 a.m.: PANEL DISCUSSIONS (Concurrent Sessions)*
 
Hunger and Thirst: Interpretations
Millicent Borges Accardi, Jacob M. Appel, Nathan Brown, Sarah Crossland, Joan Leegant, Aimee Nezhukumatathil, Francine Ringold
 
Coming to the Table: Q&A on Editing and Publishing
Cristina García, Kristina Gorcheva-Newberry, Cynthia Gustavson, Jon Katz, Eilis O’Neal, Lynn Shoemaker, Jessica Spotswood
        
10:45 a.m.- 12:00 noon: Morning Masterclasses (Concurrent Sessions)*
 
Hands-on One-on-One Editing Workshops I    
Meet one on one with a Nimrod editor who will help you revise your work.  Submit 2-3 pages of poetry or 4-5 pages of fiction.  Materials must be received by October 12th.  Each one-on-one editing session is 15 minutes long.
 
Fiction I: Cultivating Chaos: A Hunger for the Unexpected — Cristina García
Most readers hunger for a little mystery in their reading. . . even in literary novels. Learn strategies to enliven your work with the unexpected. 
 
Poetry I: A Taste for Paper: The Letter Poem — Aimee Nezhukumatathil
Epistolary poems underscore the best intimacy that can arise from a letter: the measured and focused address to a specific recipient. How do we write letter poems, and how can they help us recognize the stranger who lives inside each of us?
 
Poetry II: A Thirst for Jazz: Writing as an Act of Music — Millicent Borges Accardi
Poetry, whether sonnet, free verse, haiku, or sestina, has a certain music to it. Discover ways that musical concepts and techniques can enrich your work, even if you aren’t a musician.
 
Memoir and the Blog: Fueling the Creative Spark — Jon Katz, Stephani Franklin
Blogs are becoming a new and vital form of memoir, a gateway to finding your voice and exploring your life. Discover the ways that blogs can fire the creative spark in memoirists.
 
Hungering for Connection: Poetry Out Loud and Across Disciplines — Francine Ringold, Lisa Ransom
What are the basic ingredients of a great performance of poetry? Learn to create exciting scripts that bridge poetry with science, history, sports, and more!
 
On the Hunt: Finding a Literary Agent — A. J. Tierney
Ready to send your work out? Find out how to write effective queries and synopses that will help you catch that elusive creature—the literary agent.
                                     
12:00-1:30 p.m.: Lunch and Readings by the Judges
 
1:35-2:50 p.m.: Afternoon Masterclasses (Concurrent Sessions)*
 
Fiction II: Setting the Table: Creating Voice — Joan Leegant
It’s hard to describe and even harder to force, yet voice is one element writers cannot do without. Explore ways to coax out the voice in your story and find out what you might be doing to get in its way.
 
Fiction III: The Narrative of Loss — Jacob M. Appel, Kristina Gorcheva-Newberry
Writing about loss without being excessively sentimental is a delicate balance. How do we as writers render loss and make it palpable to the reader without becoming maudlin?
 
Poetry III: Tightening Our Belts: What the Audience Does and Does Not Need to Know — Nathan Brown
As writers, we know a lot about our poems that readers don’t necessarily need to know. What works, what distracts readers, and what can we leave behind?
 
Poetry IV: Writing from History and Legend: Tweaking the Recipe — Sarah Crossland, Lynn Shoemaker
Writers are often told to “write what they know,” but often the stories we hear can become as real as our own experiences. How can you use history, legends, or research to inform and energize your poetry?
 
Young Adult Fantasy: Yearning for Love Between Equals — Jessica Spotswood
Many popular YA titles feature paranormal love interests with possessive, possibly dangerous characteristics. Are there other options for romance in YA lit? How can you tap into them—and still leave your readers swooning?
 
Just for the Fun of It: Community Staged Readings Deborah J. Hunter, Alicia M. H. Latimer, Jean M. Neal
Live performance of literature can be a great way to introduce readers to new books, poems, and short stories, and it can allow writers to look at their own work in new ways. How to stage a successful live reading in your town, school, or backyard!
 
3:00-4:00 p.m.: Hands-on One-on-One Editing Workshops II*
Meet one on one with a Nimrod editor who will help you revise your work.  Submit 2-3 pages of poetry or 4-5 pages of fiction.  Materials must be received by October 12th.  Each one-on-one editing session is 15 minutes long.
 
INVITATIONAL READINGS*
Millicent Borges Accardi, Nathan Brown, Jon Katz, Joan Leegant, Jessica Spotswood
 
4:00-4:30 p.m.: BOOK SIGNING
                           
 
*Registrants may attend one morning panel discussion, one morning masterclasss and one afternoon masterclass, as well as the entire reading from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m.  Afternoon one-on-one editing participants may move to and from their sessions to the Invitational Readings as time permits.
 
The full Saturday conference package ($50) includes workshops, panel discussions, readings, lunch, and one-on-one editing sessions. The lunch menu includes vegetarian options.
 
Full and partial scholarships are available, particularly for students.  For scholarship information, call 918-631-3080 or email Nimrod@utulsa.edu . Scholarship recipients are asked to send in their registration fee ($10) with their registration form, and all scholarship recipients must pay this registration fee.
 
 
Judges and Master Teachers
 
Cristina García, 2013 judge for the Nimrod Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Fiction, was born in Cuba and immigrated to the U.S. with her family in the 1960s. She is the author of five novels for adults, including King of Cuba, The Lady Matador’s Hotel, and National Book Award finalist Dreaming in Cuban. She is also the author of three books for younger readers, including Dreams of Significant Girls, and one collection of poetry, The Lesser Tragedy of Death. She is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Whiting Writers’ Award, a Hodder Fellowship at Princeton University, and a National Endowment for the Arts grant. She teaches at Texas Tech University and is the founder and artistic director of Las Dos Brujas Writers’ Workshops in Texas.
 
Aimee Nezhukumatathil, 2013 judge for the Nimrod Pablo Neruda Prize in Poetry, is the author of Lucky Fish, At the Drive-In Volcano, and Miracle Fruit. She is the winner of the gold medal in poetry for the Independent Publishers Book Awards, a Balcones Prize, a Pushcart Prize, and ForeWord Magazine’s Book of the Year Award. Her poems and essays have been widely anthologized, including in Poetry 180: A Poem a Day and Language for a New Century: Contemporary Asian American Poetry, and have appeared in American Poetry Review, Slate, Prairie Schooner, Tin House, and Nimrod. She is an Associate Professor of English at State University of New York-Fredonia.
 
 
2013 Nimrod Award Winners
 
Jacob M. Appel, winner of the second prize in fiction, is the author of the novels The Man Who Wouldn’t Stand Up and The Biology of Luck.  His short stories have been published in more than two hundred literary journals. He teaches at the Gotham Writers’ Workshop and practices medicine in New York City.
 
Sarah Crossland, winner of this year’s first prize in poetry, likes to write poems about dead people, holiness, lying, and love. The recipient of the 2012 Boston Review Poetry Prize and a 2013 AWP Intro Journals Award, she is currently working on a book about disguises and forgeries, called Impostress. She lives in Charlottesville, Virginia.
 
Kristina Gorcheva-Newberry, this year’s first-prize winner in fiction, was born and raised in Moscow, Russia. She received an M.A. in English from Radford University and an M.F.A. in Creative Writing from Hollins University. Her work has recently appeared in The Southern Review, The Louisville Review, CALYX, Arts & Letters, Confrontation, and elsewhere. Her short fiction has been a finalist in Glimmer Train Stories’ writing contests and the 2010 Katherine Anne Porter Prize for Fiction. She lives in West Virginia.
 
Lynn Shoemaker, this year’s second-prize winner in poetry, grew up in South Dakota, traveled east and west to college, has taught in various universities and is retired from the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. He has traveled as a human rights worker and witness to Central America, Cuba, and Iraq. In addition to publishing in many journals, he has published four books and chapbooks, the latest a chapbook entitled A Catch in the Throat of Allah.
 
 
Master Teachers
 
Millicent Borges Accardi, a Portuguese-American poet, is the author of three poetry collections—Injuring Eternity, Woman on a Shaky Bridge, and Only More So (forthcoming)—and the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, among others.  Her work has appeared in Babalonia, Nimrod, Tampa Review, and New Letters. She holds degrees in English and writing from California State University, Long Beach, and in Professional Writing from the University of Southern California, and works as a freelance writer.
 
Nathan Brown is a singer-songwriter, photographer, and award-winning poet who is the current Poet Laureate of Oklahoma (2013/2014). He has published eight books, including Karma Crisis: New and Selected Poems, and Letters to the One-Armed Poet, his first memoir. A previous collection of poetry, Two Tables Over, won the 2009 Oklahoma Book Award.  He is also a professional songwriter and musician, whose most recent album is Gypsy Moon. Holder of an interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Creative and Professional Writing from the University of Oklahoma, he currently teaches there, and he has served as the Artist in Residence at the University of Central Oklahoma.
Stephani Franklin, memoirist, short story writer, and poet, is a member of the Nimrod Advisory Board. Her nonfiction has appeared in the U.K. journal Here Comes Everybody, and her short fiction has been recognized by the Tulsa City-County Library’s Adult Creative Writing Contest. She was a presenter at the 2013 Scissortail Creative Writing Festival, and is currently working on a historical novel that fictionalizes her late father’s experiences in WWII.
 
Cynthia Gustavson, a Nimrod poetry editor, is a psychotherapist and poet. Winner of a 2002 New Millennium Writing Award and a 2004 finalist for the Rita Dove Poetry Award from the Salem College Center for Women Writers, she has taught classes at Louisiana State University, as well as lectured on the use of poetry in healing, at Phillips Theological School in Tulsa and the OU School of Medicine. Author of the In-Versing Your Life poetry therapy workbook series, she also has five poetry collections and is working on a memoir.
 
Deborah J. Hunter, poet, performance artist and actor, has facilitated poetry workshops and worked as a poet-in-residence in schools and community programs since 1997. She was a 2013 Oklahoma Poet Laureate nominee. She is on the Advisory Board of the Oklahoma Center for Poets and Writers.  Her poetry has appeared in numerous literary journals and anthologies, including Nimrod, Another Sun (U.K.), Aroostook Review, and A Voice Was Sounding. She has been acting in local stage productions since 2000, had a small role in an independent film and performs her one-woman spoken-word performance piece, Amazons, Gypsies and Wandering Minstrels to give voice to marginalized women.
 
Jon Katz has written twenty-one books: eight novels, one collection of short stories, and twelve works of nonfiction, including Soul of a Dog, Izzy & Lenore, Dog Days, A Good Dog, and The Dogs of Bedlam Farm. He is also a photographer and the author of two children’s books, Meet the Dogs of Bedlam Farm and Lenore Finds a Friend. He has written for The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Slate, Rolling Stone, and the AKC Gazette. He has worked for CBS News, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, and The Philadelphia Inquirer. He lives on Bedlam Farm in upstate New York.
 
Alicia M. H. Latimer is employed as the African-American Resource Center Coordinator for the Tulsa City-County Library System.  She has received numerous community service awards, including the North Tulsa Greenwood Heritage Image Builder’s Award, the City of Tulsa’s Pinnacle Award, and the Williams Companies’ Women of Inspiration Award.  She has been involved in grass-roots community theater for the past twenty-four years, having acted as an artistic director and actor.  She is the author of one novel, Soul Ties: Those Eyes, Those Eyes.
 
Joan Leegant is the author of the novel Whenever You Go and the short story collection An Hour in Paradise. She is the winner of the PEN/New England Book Award, the Wallant Award, and a finalist for the National Jewish Book Award; Wherever You Go was named by the Union for Reform Judaism one of its “Significant Jewish Books.” A former attorney, she taught at Harvard University for eight years. Since 2007, she has lived half the year in Tel Aviv, where she is the visiting writer at Bar-Ilan University. She is a 2013-14 Visiting Assistant Professor at Oklahoma State University.
 
Jean M. Neal is the Administrative Coordinator for the John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation in Tulsa. She is a playwright and composer of song and poetry, and has produced and directed numerous plays. She produced and starred in a local television production, Answers in the Word. She is working on her first screenplay, as well as her first children’s book.
 
Eilis O’Neal, Nimrod’s Editor-in-Chief, is the author of the young adult fantasy novel The False Princess, which was honored as a YALSA Best Book for Young Adults, as well as an ABC New Voices selection and an ABC Best Book for Children selection. Her short fantasy has appeared in Realms of Fantasy, Strange Horizons, Fantasy Magazine, Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet, and other magazines.
 
Lisa Ransom, Co-Poetry Editor of Nimrod, is a poet as well as freelance editor of memoir and non-fiction.  She has published work in Mid-America Poetry Review, Nimrod, Avocet, Creosote and others and was the Recipient of an Edgar Lee Masters Prize.
 
Francine Ringold, Nimrod’s Senior Advisory Editor and Editor-in-Chief for over 40 years, completed two terms as Oklahoma’s Poet Laureate (2003-2005, 2005-2007). Her book of poems, Still Dancing, won the Oklahoma Book Award in 2005.  Her books include The Trouble with Voices: Poetry, another Oklahoma Book Award winner; Every Other One, with Manly Johnson; and Making Your Own Mark: Writing and Drawing for Senior Citizens. Her newest books, a memoir entitled Never Enough Births: A Love Story & Guide to Writing Your Memoir and Mine and a poetry collection entitled Dog Days: A Way of Speaking, are forthcoming
 
Jessica Spotswood is the author of The Cahill Witch Chronicles, a projected trilogy, of which the first two volumes, Born Wicked and Star Cursed, are now available.  She studied theatre in at Washington College and Catholic University and began writing YA fantasy in 2007.  She lives in Washington, D.C. with her husband, playwright Steven Spotswood, and her cat, Monkey.
A. J. Tierney obtained an M.F.A. in Writing from Sarah Lawrence College, and then joined the Fine Print Literary Agency in New York City, where she worked as an agent under the legendary Peter Rubie.  She is the founder of Tierney Literary Services, which provides editorial, coaching, and critique services for writers at all levels. Her work has appeared in The Dead Mule School of Southern Literature, Foliate Oak, Narrative Magazine, and River Lit. 
 
A supplement to the biographical notes will be available at the conference and will introduce additional one-on-one editors.
 
 
REGISTRATION FORM
 
NAME:
 
 
ADDRESS:
 
 
CITY, STATE, ZIP:
 
 
PHONE:
 
 
EMAIL
 
 
___ I wish to purchase a Two-Day Pass for the Nimrod Awards Weekend, which includes both the Nimrod Awards Dinner on Friday, October 18th, 6:30 p.m., and the entire Nimrod Conference for Readers and Writers on Saturday, October 19th, 9:30 a.m-4:00 p.m., Allen Chapman Activity Center, TU, 5th & Gary.  Reservations and payment for the Two Day Pass must be received by October 10th.
 
_____ x $100 = $ _____
 
___ I wish to purchase a One-Day Pass to the Nimrod Conference for Readers and Writers on Saturday, October 19th, 9:30 a.m-4:30 p.m., Allen Chapman Activity Center, TU, 5th & Gary.  The cost for the all-day Saturday conference includes masterclasses, workshops, panels, readings, and lunch. Registrants for the One-Day Conference Pass may register up to Late Registration on the 19th.
 
 
_____ x $50 (full registration) = $ _____
_____ x $10 (scholarship applicants) = $ _____
 
___I wish to attend only the Awards Dinner on Friday, October 18th, 6:30 p.m., Allen Chapman Activity Center, TU, 5th & Gary. Reservations and payment for the Awards Dinner only must be received by October 10th.
 
Make checks payable to:
 Nimrod International Journal
800 S. Tucker Dr.
Tulsa, OK 74104
 
Conference Schedule and Registration Form: Saturday, October 19th, 2013
 
Concurrent Sessions: Each registrant may attend all readings, as well as lunch and tea, but only one panel discussion, and one morning and one afternoon masterclass. Please indicate your first and second choices for concurrent sessions.  Early registration will help to assure first choice.
 
Concurrent Panels (Please indicate your first and second choices.)
 
10:00-10:40 a.m.
 
___ Hunger and Thirst: Interpretations
Millicent Borges Accardi, Jacob M. Appel, Nathan Brown, Sarah Crossland, Joan Leegant, Aimee Nezhukumatathil, Francine Ringold
 
___ Coming to the Table: Q&A on Editing and Publishing
Cristina García, Kristina Gorcheva-Newberry, Cynthia Gustavson, Jon Katz, Eilis O’Neal, Lynn Shoemaker, Jessica Spotswood
 
Masterclasses—Concurrent Sessions (Please indicate your first and second choices.)
 
10:45 a.m.-12:00 noon
Morning Masterclasses:
___ Hands-on One-on-One Editing Workshops I
___I have included a sample of my writing (2-3 pages of poetry or 4-5 pages of fiction) for pre-review by my editor. Materials must be received by October 12th.
___ Fiction I: Cultivating Chaos: A Hunger for the Unexpected
Cristina García     
___ Poetry I: A Taste for Paper: The Letter Poem
Aimee Nezhukumatathil
___ Poetry II: A Thirst for Jazz: Writing as an Act of Music
Millicent Borges Accardi
___ Memoir and the Blog: Fueling the Creative Spark
Jon Katz, Stephani Franklin
___ Hungering for Connection: Poetry Out Loud and Across Disciplines
Francine Ringold, Lisa Ransom
___ On the Hunt: Finding a Literary Agent
A. J. Tierney
 
1:35-2:50 p.m. (Please indicate your first and second choices.)
 
Afternoon Masterclasses:
___ Fiction II: Setting the Table: Creating Voice
Joan Leegant
___ Fiction III: The Narrative of Loss
Jacob M. Appel, Kristina Gorcheva-Newberry
___ Poetry III: Tightening Our Belts: What the Audience Does and Does Not Need to Know
Nathan Brown
___ Poetry IV: Writing from History and Legend: Tweaking the Recipe
Sarah Crossland, Lynn Shoemaker
___ Young Adult Fantasy: Yearning for Love Between Equals
Jessica Spotswood
___ Just for the Fun of It: Community Staged Readings   
Deborah J. Hunter, Alicia M. H. Latimer, Jean M. Neal 
 
3:00-4:00 p.m.**
___ Hands-on One-on-One Editing Workshops II
___I have included a sample of my writing (2-3 pages of poetry or 4-5 pages of            fiction) for pre-review by my editor. Materials must be received by October 12th.
 
**Readings by invited guests will also take place from 3:00-4:00 p.m. and are open to all conference attendees. Book signings by our invited guests will take place from 4:00-4:30 p.m.
 
Registrants may attend one morning panel discussion, one morning and one afternoon masterclass, as well as the entire reading from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m.  Afternoon one-on-one editing participants may move from their sessions to the Invitational Readings as time permits.
 
 
Call: (918) 631-3080
 
Full and partial scholarships are available, particularly for students.  For scholarship information, email Nimrod@utulsa.edu or call (918) 631-3080.
 
Professional development credit is available for Tulsa Public Schools teachers.
 
Please note that some classes will take place in an adjacent building. If you require special assistance to reach classes outside the main building, please contact Nimrod prior to the conference to make arrangements. If you require assistance and are registering late, please speak to a staff member at the time of your registration.
 
The University of Tulsa is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.  For EEO/AA information, contact the Office of Legal Compliance at (918) 631-2423; for disability accommodations, contact Tawny Taylor at (918) 631-2334.
 
 
 
Hotel Information:
 
The official conference hotel is the Hyatt Regency, located at 100 E. 2nd St. in downtown Tulsa, and they are offering a special conference rate of $89.00 a night. The Hyatt is a five-minute drive from TU’s campus (though it is not suitable for walking to campus).
 
To receive the conference rate, please make your reservations using this link. Or make your reservations by phone by calling 888-421-1442 and asking for the Nimrod Journal/University of Tulsa conference rate.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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