Energy Management

Energy Management and Construction


Energy Metering Project

If you live in TU apartments, then you have access to the PSO GridSmart

  1. Go to PSOklahoma.com/Go/PSOhomeSMART
  2. Already have an existing PSO online account? Simply log in with your existing User ID and Password.
  3. Not Registered? Click the "Register" button, and follow the simple registration process. It's very helpful to have a copy of your bill handy, if you don't, you can still register. Just be ready to verify your account by providing us with information such as:
        - Home phone number for the account
        - Your AEP Oklahoma account number
        - Last four digits of your social security number
        - A billed amount from any of your last three bills
        - Your email address
  4. View your daily electricity use  

Campus Wide Metering- eventual goal is to offer an Energy Dashboard showing gas, electric and water usage of individual buildings on campus.

Efficient Buildings

The goal is to improve building features to save money and electricity. A specific target is installation of occupancy sensors as part of all renovations and new construction to save lighting costs.

Retrofitted 26 acorn lights at Norman Village

The existing fixtures were a 175 watt metal halide and they consumed 192 watts each. The new lamps are a 100 watt induction and consume 100 watts each. A yearly savings based on a 12 hour per day burn average would be as follows:

  • 92.5 watts x 26 fixtures x 12 hours per day=28.86 KWh/day 28.86 KWh x $0.08/KWh x 365=$840.40/year
  • Installation costs were $5,670.00. Payback time is 6.75 years on energy only. Induction lamps are rated to last 100,000 hours (22.8 years) versus 7,500 hours (1.71years) for the metal halide.

Occupancy Sensors- Mabee Gym Locker Rooms

Occupancy sensors were installed on men rooms in the rowing area. These control 36 two lamp T8 strips. Most of these lights burned 24 hours per day. Yearly savings would be as follows:

  • 58.8 watts per fixture x 36 fixtures x 24 hours per day=50.8 KWh per day 50.8 KWh/day x 364 x $0.08/KWh=$1,479.30 per year
  • These locker rooms are used sparingly. The rowing team is there after practice in the morning and the men

Reynolds Center Lighting Control

Installed occupancy sensors in arena level restrooms and reprogrammed the lighting controls so they would burn only during events. Based on conservative estimates this will save 75,999 KWh per year or $6,338.80. There was a rebate of $215.60. Payback for energy only, not including rebate is .92 years. In most cases these lights will have less burn time on the lamps and ballasts in a year than they had in a month.

Lights on Central photocell

14 apartment buildings were added to the central photocell. The standalone photocells which previously controlled these lights were installed in areas where they would not turn off until an hour or more after the rest of campus. They would also come on an hour or more before the others. Each of these controlled site lighting for streets and parking areas as well as the building lights.

  • There are 99-175 watt wall packs, 459-13 watt porch lights, 4-1000 watt pole lights, 46-400 watt pole lights, 54-175 watt acorns, 23-100 watt in-grades, 8-70 watt in-grades and 28-39 watt in-grades fed from these buildings. These represent 119.27 KWh per day for two extra hours of burn time. That equates to 43,533.55 KWh per year and $4,788.69 per year. Install costs were $3,874.00. Payback time is 0.81 years on energy only.
  • Installed occupancy sensors in arena level restrooms and reprogrammed the lighting controls so they would burn only during events. Based on conservative estimates this will save 75,999 KWh per year or $6,338.80. There was a rebate of $215.60. Payback for energy only, not including rebate is .92 years. In most cases these lights will have less burn time on the lamps and ballasts in a year than they had in a month.14 apartment buildings were added to the central photocell. The standalone photocells which previously controlled these lights were installed in areas where they would not turn off until an hour or more after the rest of campus. They would also come on an hour or more before the others. Each of these controlled site lighting for streets and parking areas as well as the building lights.

Holmes Student Center to Central Photocell

Campus lights fed from Holmes Student Center were controlled by a time clock. As the dusk/dawn times shift throughout the year, the time clock gets less and less accurate. Network control was installed so they will be controlled by the central photocell. There are 11-175 watt ball lights, 2-100 watt in-grades and 4-400 watt parking lot lights fed from this building. If we use an average of two hours per day extra burn time, an extra 4.24 KWh per day used. That equates to 1547.6 KWh per year and $92.86 per year. The install costs were $218.00. Payback time is 2.3 years on energy only.

La Fortune Hall Exterior LEDs

Around the north and west sides of LaFortune Hall, there are 35 recessed cans. These wash the exterior walls at night with light. 90 watt incandescent lamps were installed. We installed 18 watt Led lamps as a replacement. Rated life is 50,000 hours for the LED and 2500 for the incandescent lamp. Based on this info, savings would be:

  • LED-50,000 hours of operation
  • 18 watts x 50,000 hours x 35 lamps=31,500 KWh=$1,260.00 + 1 set of 35 lamps @ $41.25=$1,433.75
  • Total without labor=$2,703.75
  • Total with labor=$2,703.75 + 4 hours @ $25 each = $100.00=$2,803.75
  • Incandescant-50,000 hours of operation
    • 90 watts x 50,000 hours x 35 lamps=157,000 KWh=$6,300.00 + 20 sets of 35 lamps @ $5.00 each=$3,500.00
    • Total without labor=$9,800.00Total with labor=$9,800.00 + 4 hours @ $25 each = $100.00 x 20 lamps changes =$2,000.00=$11,800.00

    Kendall Hall-Outside LEDs

    21 incandescent lights were changed to LED lamps around Kendall Hall. These were 75 watt lamps and now are 15 watt LEDs. Savings are as follows:

    • LED-50,000 hours of operation
    • 15 watts x 50,000 hours x 21 lamps=15,750 KWh=$630.00 + 1 set of 21 lamps @ $41.25=$866.25
    • Total without labor=$1,496.25
    • Total with labor=$1,496.25 + 3 hours @ $25 each = $75.00=$1,571.25
    • Incandescant-50,000 hours of operation
    • 75 watts x 50,000 hours x 21 lamps=78,750 KWh=$3,150.00 + 20 sets of 21 lamps @ $5.00 each=$2,100.00
    • Total without labor=$5,250.00
    • Total with labor=$5,250.00 + 3 hours @ $25 each = $75.00 x 20 lamps changes =$1,500.00=$6,750.00

    Oliphant Hall-network control and LEDs

    Around the outside of Oliphant Hall are recessed cans with 75 watt lamps as well as 2 x 175 watt metal halide wall packs. They were controlled by a time clock and typically burned at least two hours per day extra. The recessed cans were retrofitted with LED lamps and network control of all of these lights was added. Savings are as follows:

    • LED-50,000 hours of operation
    • 15 watts x 50,000 hours x 21 lamps=15,750 KWh=$630.00 + 1 set of 21 lamps @ $41.25=$866.25
    • Total without labor=$1,496.25
    • Total with labor=$1,496.25 + 3 hours @ $25 each = $75.00=$1,571.25
    • Incandescant-50,000 hours of operation
    • 75 watts x 50,000 hours x 21 lamps=78,750 KWh=$3,150.00 + 20 sets of 21 lamps @ $5.00 each=$2,100.00
    • Total without labor=$5,250.00
    • Total with labor=$5,250.00 + 3 hours @ $25 each = $75.00 x 20 lamps changes =$1,500.00=$6,750.00

    Network control-Helmerich Hall

    Lighting on Dietler Commons and along 5th street is fed from Helmerich Hall. These lights were controlled by a photocell between Chapman Hall and Helmerich. Because of shadows in the morning and evening these lights burned at least four hours extra each day. Network control was installed using orking Savings below do not include labor or parts based on a reduced burn time each day.

    • 27-175 watt metal halide-192.5 watts x 4 hours x 365 days=7588.35 KWh=$303.53/year
    • 58-100 watt metal halide-110 watts x 4 hours x 365 days=9314.8 KWh=$372.59/year
    • 20-50 watt metal halide-55 watts x 4 hours x 365 days=1606 KWh=$64.24/year
    • 12-400 watt metal halide-55 watts x 4 hours x 365 days=7708.8 KWh=$308.35/year
    • Total annual savings-$1,048.71
    • Installed costs were $241.00 including labor.

    Occupancy sensors-USA West clubhouse

    Two restrooms with exhaust fans have had lights burning 24 hours per day until occupancy sensors were installed. Not counting ballasts or labor (or heating/cooling savings), the saving would be:

    • 520 watts x 24 hours a day x 365=4555.2 KWh=$455.52
    • These restrooms are only used when the pool is open, so it is virtually 100% savings, with the exception of the install costs of $275.00.

    Apartment Laundries

    The laundries in the 6 apartment complexes (Norman, Brown, Lorton, Mayo, USA West, and USA East) were retrofitted with occupancy sensors. These lights were generally left on by the users, but if we use 12 hours average and could cut it down to four hours per day, the savings would be:

    • 3360 watts x 12 hours per day x 365 days per year = 14,716.8 KWh=$1,471.68 per year
    • 3360 watts x 4 hours per day x 365 days per year = 4,905.6 KWh=$490.56 per year
    • Annual savings are $981.12. We spent $910.00 installing the including labor.

    Physical Plant Boiler Room Retrofit (WFF)

    In the Central Plant there were 40, 400 watt metal halide low bay fixtures. These fixtures burned 24 hours per day without switching provisions because of the cool down/warm up time problems. These fixtures pulled 440 watts each. The metal halide fixtures were replaced one for one with a four lamp T5HO fluorescent fixture. We added switches for 37 of the fixtures and 3 were left on all the time for emergency/walkthrough lighting. The new fixtures pull 232 watts each.

    • Based on a 24 hour per day burn, the metal halide fixtures consumed: 440 watts x 40 fixtures x 24 hours per day=422.4 KWh/day=$16.90/day=$6,167.04/year
    • Based on an 8 hour per day burn (and it should average far less) for 37 and 24 hour per day burn for 3 fixtures, the 40 new fixtures consume: 232 watts x 37 fixtures x 8 hours per day=68.672 KWh/day=$2.75/day=$1,002.61/year 232 watts x 3 fixtures x 24 hours per day=16.704 KWh per day=$0.67/day=$243.88/year Total of 40 new fixtures=85.376 KWh/day=$3.42/day=$1,248.30/year
    • Based on the above figures, we are saving the following: Electrical energy saved per year-123,013.76 KWh Dollars saved per year-$4,918.74
    • Our total costs were $17,920.00 with an outside contractor. We also submitted this project to the PSO Smart Schools program. Through this program we received a rebate of $5,372.99 based on demand reduction. With this rebate factored in our payback is 2.55 years.

    Arena seating lights

    Currently in the arena there are 400 6 watt seat mounted aisle lights. These are being changed out to LED. The savings will look like this:

    • Current lamp-6S6-6 watt
    • Life=1500 hours
    • 1500/20 hours per week=1.44 years
    • Lifetime energy=6 watts x 400 lamps x 1500 hours=3600 KWh per year x 1.44 years =5184 KWh=$207.36
    • Based on 100,000 hours to equal LED
    • 96.154/1.44=66.77 lamps to equal one LED lamp
    • Based on the 100,000 hours life of the LED above, using the 6S6 to equal 100,000 hours would take:
    • 400 lamps (installed) x 66.77=26,708 lamps @$0.60 each = $16,024.80 in cost of lamps only (no labor)
    • Energy for 100,000 hours $207.36 x 66.77= $13,845.43
    • 100,000 hours with 6S6 (no labor) =$29,870.2
    • Labor for this lamp for 100,000 hours=$66,770.00
    • Total cost = $96,640.23
    • LED cost for 100,000 hours
    • 400 lamps with caps=$6.20 + $1.25 each x 400 lamps =$2,980.00 (lamps only no labor)
    • Energy=$3,840.00
    • Total for 100,000 hours (no labor) =$6,820.00
    • Labor for this lamp for 100,000 hours = $1,000.00
    • Total cost = $7,820.00
    • In the life of one set of LED lamps there is a savings of $88,820.23.

    Occupancy Sensors-Chapman Stadium

    All floors of the press box as well as the east and west locker rooms, restrooms and concession stands were retrofitted with occupancy sensors. These areas were previously controlled by the energy management system, and were left on for extended periods of time. All of the lighting now controlled with occupancy sensors is 57,000 watts. Energy savings (with no labor/material costs) based on a 14 hour per day burn and 280 days a year is:

    • 57 KW x 14 hours x 280 days=223440 KWh=$8,937.60
    • Many of these hours are when lights are left on over the weekend after an event. These burn times will now be eliminated. Burn time can also be eliminated on most areas and the press box can only burn when someone is there.
    • If all areas are used for game days (6 events x 12 hours occupied) and the press box is used twice each month for eight hour events (floor by floor) the cost would be as follows:
      • 57 KW x 12 hours x 6 days=4,104 KWh=$164.16
      • 13.5 KW x 8 hours x 24 events=2,592 KWh=$103.68
      • Total=$267.84
      • Annual savings are $8,669.76, not including materials or labor. Cost of materials for this project were $8,489.94.

      Occupancy Sensors-Case Tennis

      Occupancy sensors were installed in most common areas and offices in the building as well as the free standing rest room/concession building. The calculated load of this lighting is 16414.2 watts or 16.41 KW. These lights were turned on at 5 AM and were left on until 11 PM, 18 hours each day. With the occupancy sensors many of these lights will only burn a few times a year and the rest will cycle on and off with occupancy. If we use an average of 4 hours a day for these lights we save 14 hours of burn time each day. Based only on energy (no labor or materials savings), the annual savings would be:

      • 14 hours x 16.41 KW x 280 days each year=64,327.2 KWh=$2,573.09.
      • Material costs for this project were $4,306.26

      Kendall Hall-Potential Savings

      Kendall Hall is a building where the benefit of LED lamps could improve the overall situation. The building (especially common areas) is on the dark side and most of the lights are high and difficult to change. Switching from incandescent lamps to LED lamps would improve both of thes, and yield not only energy savings but labor savings as well. The LED lamps have a 50,000 hour life versus the 2500 hours of the incandescent. The projected savings in 50,000 hours would look like the following:

      • Incandescent
        • 72 x 90 watt lamps x 50,000 hours=324,000 KWh=$12,960.00
        • 16 x 75 watt lamps x 50,000 hours=60,000 KWh=$2,400.00
        • 50,000 hours / 2,500 hours=20 lamp changes
        • 20 x 72 x $5.00=$7,200.00
        • 20 x 16 x $4.50=$1,440.00
        • Labor to change lamps= 2 men x 3 days x 20 lamp changes=$24,000.00
        • Total cost of incandescent for 50,000 hours=$48,000.00
        • LED
          • 72 x 15 watt lamps x 50,000 hours=54,000 KWh=$2,160.00
          • 16 x 8 watt lamps x 50,000 hours=6,400 KWh=$256.00
          • 72 x $39.43=$2,838.96
          • 16 x $26.82=$429.12
          • Labor to change lamps= 2 men x 3 days x 1 lamp changes=$1,200.00
          • Total cost of LED for 50,000 hours=$6,884.08
          • Potential savings in life of one set of LED lamps=$41,115.92

          Power factor correction

          Power factor correction is a penalty applied to our AEP bill each month. We have looked into installing equipment to correct it for several years. We typically ran at about 82% to 85% in 2010 on the Physical Plant meter. After the redesign of the Plant and the installation of VFDs for the large motors and chillers, we now run in the 91% to 94% range. Our penalty is about $7,500.00 per year. In 2010 the penalty was about $30,000.00. The equipment to correct the power factor is $250,000.00 plus installation. Payback before was 8-10 years but now is 35 years plus.

          The strategy for the future is to replace as possible/required, across the line starters with VFDs across campus. If we use the money to install these in lieu of the correction equipment, we not only correct power factor (less penalty) we also get free energy savings, often as much as 10-15% with no change in the amount of air/water being moved. We also gain the ability to change the speed of the motor as more/less is required of it, thereby having additional savings.

          LED lamps-Fisher Hall Patio

          Construction

          LEEDS protocol utilized when possible - design to LEEDS certificate standards

          • Energy Wheel Exhaust Air Recovery Device in Case Athletic (Trane)
          • Programmable central control features in new academic buildings (high efficiency automated system with variable speed drives to control heating and AC
          • ASHRAE principles for new construction for bldg envelope and AC design (with payback of 10 years or less).
          • Daylighting incorporated into building design and renovations
          • Several renovations utilized existing structures (Collins Hall and Case Sports Complex)
          • High Reflective (albedo) roof installed in sports arena
          • Centralized energy management plant - optimum operation cooling towers, chillers and boilers and use of most powerful central energy management controls by Johnson Controls/ABS
          • Water Conservation: Low-Flow showerheads installed in most buildings, faucet aerators are being replaced with low-flow fixtures, transition to front-loading washing machines in housing is utilizing high efficiency laundry technologies to replace older less efficient models and physical plant utilizes system to detect and repair leaks
          • Programmable thermostats with timers based on occupancy hours as appropriate
          • Energy Reduction: motion detectors and/or light sensors, LED lighting (LED Exit lights in 40 bldg), Compact Fluorescent lighting
          • Energy related performance contracting
          • Plate and Frame Heat Exchanger for Off Season Cooling from water cooling tower (30 buildings)
          • Variable Speed drives on Air Handlers and Heating/Cooling Pumps (30 buildings)
          • Sustainability Committee promotes program to
          • Pervious Paving installed at Tennis Center along vegetated areas designed to filter storm water runoff
          • Efficient Fume Hood Energy Management System installed Keplinger (1 bldg)
          • Genave Rogers Fountain utilizing a holding tank and filtration system. Water is also captured along the West and North sides of the fountain for reuse. Also uses an automatic wind detection to control height of fountain to reduce water usage.