Fall 2003, Vol. 22, No. 2

From the Editor, 263-270
Holly Laird

Articles

Editing Early Modern Women Writers

“And Thus Leave Off”: Reevaluating Mary Wroth’s Folger Manuscript, V.a.104, 273-291
Heather Dubrow

Terrible Texts, “Marginal” Works, and the Mandate of the Moment: The Case of Eliza Haywood, 293-314
Alexander Pettit

Confined and Exposed: Elizabeth Carter’s Classical Translations, 315-334
Jennifer Wallace

“I am Equally Weary of Confinement”: Women Writers and Rasselas from Dinarbus to Jane Eyre, 335-356
Jessica Richard

Granny at Seventeen: Mary Sarton’s Early Encounters with the Land of Old Age, 357-370
Sylvia Henneberg

The Eroticism of Class and the Enigma of Margaret Atwood’s Alias Grace, 371-386
Sandra Kumamoto Stanley

Hausa Women Writers Confronting the Traditional Status of Women in Modern Islamic Society: Feminist Thought in Nigerian Popular Fiction, 387-408
Novian Whitsitt

Reviews

Analyzing Freud: Letters of H.D., Bryher, and Their Circle, edited by Susan Stanford Friedman, 409-411
Ann L. Ardis

Modernist Women and Visual Cultures: Virgina Woolf, Vanessa Bell, Photography and Cinema, by Maggie Humm, 411-416
Diane Burton

Shirley Jackson’s American Gothic, by Darryl Hattenhauer, 416-417
Stephanie Branson

The Bleeding of America: Menstruation as Symbolic Economy in Pynchon, Faulkner, and Morrison, by Dana Medro, 417-419
Olivia Martin-Phillips

Maternal Body and Voice in Toni Morrison, Bobbie Ann Mason, and Lee Smith, by Paula Gallant Eckard, 419-423
Dorothy M. Scura

Revising Women: Eighteenth-Century “Women’s Fiction” and Social Engagement, edited by Paula R. Backscheider, 423-425
Rikki Noel-Williams

Spring 2003, Vol. 22, No. 1

From the Editor, 7-11
Holly Laird

Archives

Ann Yearsley and the Politics of Patronage, The Thorp Arch Archive: Part II, 13-56
Frank Felsenstein

Articles

Lesbian Criticism and Feminist Criticism: Readings of Millenium Hall, 57-80
Sally O’Driscoll

Bachelors and “Old Maids”: Antirevolutionary British Women Writers and Narrative Authority after the French Revolution, 81-98
Lisa Wood

“So Minute and Yet So Alive”: Domestic Modernity in E.H. Young’s William, 99-120
Stella Deen

Mad and Modern: A Reading of Emily Holmes Coleman and Antonia White, 121-147
Kylie Valentine

Homoerotics of Influence: Eudora Welty Romances Virginia Woolf, 149-171
Shameem Black

“The Hero is Married and Ascends the Throne”: The Economics of Narrative End in Shirley Jackson’s We Have Always Lived in the Castle, 173-191
Honor McKitrick Wallace

Review Essay

Yes, Miss Burney, 193-201
Betty Rizzo

Reviews

Feminism Beyond Modernism, by Elizabeth A. Flynn, 203-206
Margaret D. Stetz

Melanie Klein, by Julia Kristeva, 206-209
J. M. Baker, Jr.

Rethinking Women’s Collaborative Writing: Power, Difference, Propery, by Lorraine York, 209-211
Janice Doan and Devon Hodges

Influencing America’s Tastes: Realism in the Works of Wharton, Cather and Hurst, by Stephanie Lewis Thompson, 211-214
Michael H. Berglund

Jane Austen and the Theatre, by Penny Gay, 214-216
Maria H. Frawley

Suniti Namjoshi: The Artful Transgressor, by C. Vijayasree, 216-217
Ruth Vanita

Remapping the Home Front: Locating Citizenship in British Women’s Great War Fiction, by Debra Rae Cohen, 218-219
Geneviève Brassard

Eat My Words: Reading Women’s Lives Through the Cookbooks They Wrote, by Janet Theophano, 220-221
Patricia Moran

Mary Wollstonecraft Sojourner Truth Margaret Atwood Abigail Adams Amy Tan H.D. Simone de Beauvoir Zora Neale Hurston Frances Burney Virginia Woolf

"The white saxifrage with the indented leafe is moste commended for the breakinge of the Stone."

— Turner, Herbal, III, 68 [1568]