Reviews, Spring 2010, Vol. 29, No. 1

Writing Gender in Women’s Letter Collections of the Italian Renaissance, by Meredith K. Ray, 181-183
Cosetta Seno Reed

Figuring Modesty in Feminist Discourse Across the Americas, 1633-1700, by Tamara Harvey, 183-186
Hilda L. Smith

The Art of Political Fiction in Hamilton, Edgeworth, and Owenson, by Susan B. Egenolf, 186-188
Ada Sharpe

Becoming a Woman of Letters: Myths of Authorship and Facts of the Victorian Market, by Linda H. Peterson, 188-190
Laurie Langbauer

Frontiers of Femininity: A New Historical Geography of the Nineteenth-Century American West, by Karen M. Morin, 190-193
Cathryn Halverson

The Color of Democracy in Women’s Regional Writing, by Jean C. Griffith, 193-194
Marjorie Pryse

The Shapes of Silence: Writing by Women of Colour and the Politics of Testimony, by Proma Tagore; Subversive Silences: Nonverbal Expression and Implicit Narrative Strategies in the Works of Latin American Women Writers, by Helene Carol Weldt-Basson, 194-199
Marta Caminero-Santangelo

Improper Modernism: Djuna Barnes’s Bewildering Corpus, by Daniela Caselli, 199-201
Susan Edmunds

Female Embodiment and Subjectivity in the Modernist Novel: The Corporeum of Virginia Woolf and Olive Moore, by Renée Dickinson, 201-202
April Pelt

Imagining Virginia Woolf: An Experiment in Critical Biography, by Maria DiBattista, 203-205
Rosemary Joyce,

I Made You to Find Me: The Coming of Age of the Woman Poet and the Politics of Poetic Address, by Jane Hedley, 205-207
Estella Lauter

Everybody’s Family Romance: Reading Incest in Neoliberal America, by Gillian Harkins, 207-210
Trysh Travis

Rainforest Narratives: The Work of Janette Turner Hospital, by David Callahan, 210-212
Bronwen Levy

100 Years of Anne with an “e”: The Centennial Study of “Anne of Green Gables,” edited by Holly Blackford, 212-214
Kathleen A. Miller

Mary Wollstonecraft Sojourner Truth Margaret Atwood Abigail Adams Amy Tan H.D. Simone de Beauvoir Zora Neale Hurston Frances Burney Virginia Woolf

"The white saxifrage with the indented leafe is moste commended for the breakinge of the Stone."

— Turner, Herbal, III, 68 [1568]